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#Kirby 100: Jack and the Argo Nuts

 

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Sure, Jack Kirby’s a revered artist, and he created some of the best known comic characters around. Captain America and the Avengers and the Inhumans and the X-men, Galactus and the Silver Surfer and Red Skull and Darkseid, Kirby had a major hand in the stories and look of the heroes and villains currently raking in millions upon millions for film franchises on both sides of the ‘verse divide. He’s a giant of a figure, as BBP continues celebrating a summer of Kirby at 100. But did you know Jack Kirby was a spy?

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Let Your Cup Runneth Over With “Time & Vine #1” On The Wednesday Run

Oh, those beautiful vistas of the Sonoma countryside – how I long for thee!

Oh, those marvelous Tuscan hills, ochre-tinted and rolling against a clear blue sky – how I want to stay again!

Oh, the endless panorama of the Barossa Valley – may the image be forever in my sight!

Oh, the cool and calming climate of the Valle de Casablanca – may I dream of you once more!

The connection to these four locales? It’s evident isn’t it?

Wine. Nectar of the capital “G” Gods. And if you’re anything like me, a good glass of wine makes for an enjoyable time.

Be it Cabernet Sauvignon, Sangiovese, Syrah or a Blanc, every glass of wine takes you to its place of origin, enlightening you to its landscape, its people and its history.

And that’s the premise to today’s release of the absolutely lovely and tasty Time & Vine #1!

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A Graphic Depiction Of The Pulitzer Classic “The Good Earth” On The Wednesday Run

We’re off the mainstream comic book board today.

Really, we’re off that board in a number of ways.

It’s not like it’s something new for “comic book” writers and illustrators to adapt classic works of fiction and non-fiction into the form of sequential art. DC Comics published a visual history of the The Bible in 1975 by industry legends Sheldon Mayer and Joe Kubert. Robert Crumb adapted The Book of Genesis nearly a decade ago. And, of course, we’ve seen countless visual versions of much-loved novels by industry favourites such as Madeleine L’Engle’s A Wrinkle In Time by Hope Larson, Richard Stark’s Parker by Darwyn Cooke, Beowulf by Santiago Garcia and David Rubin, Paul Auster’s City of Glass by Paul Karasik and David Mazzucchelli, and the works of H.P. Lovecraft – by various creators in various publications.

These, of course, are just a few.

The interesting thing is that mainstream publishers of traditional fiction and non-fiction formats have gotten in on the graphic novel game in a big way over the last decade.

And today, big time mainstream publisher Simon & Schuster, known more for those traditional formats of fiction and non-fiction, dip their toes in the warm pool of sequential art with the release of the visual version of Pulitzer Prize winning novel, The Good Earth!

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Doctor Who S10 E10: ‘The Eaters of Light’

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Once again Doctor Who explores a mystery from the pages of history itself, what happened to Legio IX Hispana?  As The Doctor and Bill and Nardole journey back to second century Scotland to find the Ninth Roman Legion, they discover a more sinister threat awaits them.  Meet me after the time jump for my thoughts on “The Eaters of Light.”

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Doctor Who S10 E03: ‘Thin Ice’

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We’re running through the standard Doctor Who companion introductory course with Bill Potts. We’ve had an adventure on Earth, and we’ve been to the future, now it’s time to go into the past. Is there something under the frozen Thames of the early 1800s eating people? Meet me after the time travel jump as The Doctor and Bill investigate “Thin Ice.”

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The Flag Was Still There In “Rebels: These Free And Independent States #1” On The Wednesday Run

And the rocket’s red glare!

The bombs bursting in air!

OK. We’re talking about comic books, not the star-spangles banner of the United States of America – although the two, seemingly disparate elements, intermingle today.

We’ve all talked about his before: one of the great things about comic books is that they are ever-malleable in terms of art, design and story. Regardless of distribution method, or frequency, or shape, or size (all great aspects inherent to comics) there’s also no effects budget to hinder the artistic look of an individual issue. There’s no defined wall, no genre that a writer can’t hurdle a story over – or gloriously crash one through!

There’s proof through the night (and day) of this belief every time we pick up and read a comic book.

Today is Wednesday. It’s new comic book arrival day, a day all comic book readers eagerly look forward to. Let’s celebrate the first issue of a new volume of stories set in America’s nascent past that proves this point – again.

Let’s celebrate Rebels: These Free And Independent States #1

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Gilbert Reviews Edwin Herbert’s Historical Mystery: ‘Mythos Christos’

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I was offered a chance to read and review a novel written by Edwin Herbert. The write-up that his publicist sent was quite intriguing and something that was definitely up my alley: Vatican conspiracies, history, mystery, and adventure. Edwin Herbert is president of his local free thought society and has been a regular op-ed newspaper columnist on topics concerning science, skepticism, and the mythical roots of various religions. Mythos Christos is his debut novel. Meet me after the jump. Read the rest of this entry

The Ten Percent: The Great Escape (1963)

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Original poster for The Great Escape, 1963.

“Ninety percent of everything is crud.” – Theodore Sturgeon

Welcome back to “The Ten Percent,” a regular column where every other week K. Dale Koontz and I take a look at the inverse of Sturgeon’s Law; in other words, the small portion of everything which is not crud. So many films premiere each year, but only a very few are remembered and revered years later. That’s not a matter of genre – the Ten Percent is a big tent, with plenty of room for comedy, drama, horror, animation, musical, science fiction and many more. But admission into the tent is not easy to come by. Films in this category last because they are high quality productions which demand more of their viewer than simple passive reception.

Before I talk about why 1963’s The Great Escape belongs in the Ten Percent, it’s worth taking the time to point out the film’s flaws. First, neither bicycles nor motorcycles were used in the 1943 escape from Stalag Luft III. Second, the “Great Escape” of 76 Allied POWs took place in unseasonably cold weather during one of the worst winters seen in Eastern Poland in 30 years. Third, there were no Americans among the escapees who were mostly British and Canadian. Finally, there was never any regulation which stated that Allied prisoners were duty-bound to attempt to escape. In fact, many, perhaps most, American and British POWs were generally leery of escape attempts.

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The “Dragonfly In Amber” Marks The Finale of Outlander Season Two

 

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The second season of Outlander has come to a conclusion. Fear not fans, it’s been renewed for two more seasons. This year has been a long buildup to the Battle of Culloden. Did we finally see the historical fight, or was it an epic letdown?

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Outlander throws “The Hail Mary” in the penultimate episode of the season

 

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On last week’s installment of Outlander, two characters who deserved to die were killed off. I’m sure no tears were shed for the loss of the Duke of Sandringham or his servant. Both were instrumental to the Paris alley attack, but Murtagh and Mary saw them both to a fitting end. Did anyone else die this week?

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