Renew your love of the New Mutants with a new Epic Collection

One of my favourite comic books growing up in the 80s was The New Mutants. As a very young kid who fell in love with the X-Men’s Kitty Pryde thanks to Marvel’s Secret Wars II and Uncanny X-Men 196 (“What Was That?”), I loved seeing how the two teams interacted with one another, and reading about a team of teenagers who were older than me, but somehow still relatable. And when (SPOILER) The Beyonder killed them off in issue 37, it actually scared the hell out of me.

Co-created by writer Chris Claremont and artist Bob McLeod, the New Mutants was an easy access point for young mutant lovers, especially as the original X-Men were growing up, marrying and having children. When Stan Lee and Jack Kirby created the original series, Marvel Girl, Cyclops, Beast, Angel and Iceman were teens themselves, while the All-New, All-Different line-up was full of older and, in some case, most battle-hardened characters.  With the New Mutants, Claremont and McLeod were able to bring being a teenage mutant into the 1980s, exploring all the angst that came along with it.

New Mutants

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Beauty and the Beast reigns, Power Rangers soar at the box office

It was another outstanding weekend for Disney’s latest remake, while a new reboot actually managed to deliver as well. Here’s what went down:

Beauty and the Beast had an incredible second weekend, bringing in an estimated $89.7 million, raising its two week total to close to $320 million. The filmed barely dropped 50% week to week, and it is clearly on its way to making more than $400 million. Could $500 million be in its grasp? Quite possibly.

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Trailer Time: Justice League

 

As someone who really enjoyed Batman v Superman, I was feeling optimistic about the new Justice League movie. The new trailer isn’t doing it for me, though, except for Gal Gadot’s Wonder Woman. What do you think?

Will Power Rangers morph into a box office hit this weekend?

It’s almost like summer at the box office, what with so many big movies opening over the last few weekends. The next three days are no different, as three new releases are about to be unleashed. Will any of them have the power to knock down the current beast at the box office. Here’s our prediction:

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Power Rangers is the reboot/reinvention of the beloved 1990s television show that has a rabid fanbase. However, are there enough fans to make this a must-see in theaters this weekend. I’m going to go out with a firm maybe. Power Rangers certainly won’t knock Beauty and the Beast from the number one spot, but it may offer up some decent counter programming along with an appeal to families who already saw Disney’s latest. Look for a second place debut with $32 million.

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The Ten Percent: Come and See (1985)

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“Ninety percent of everything is crud.” – Theodore Sturgeon

Welcome back to “The Ten Percent,” a regular column where every other week K. Dale Koontz and I take a look at the inverse of Sturgeon’s Law; in other words, the small portion of everything which is not crud. So many films premiere each year, but only a very few are remembered and revered years later. That’s not a matter of genre – the Ten Percent is a big tent, with plenty of room for comedy, drama, horror, animation, musical, science fiction and many more. But admission into the tent is not easy to come by. Films in this category last because they are high quality productions which demand more of their viewer than simple passive reception.

Elim Klimov’s Come and See (1985) takes its place in an unusual corner of the Ten Percent. A place for works of art that are so powerful, so honest, and so terrible that they absolutely must be seen, but which are also so psychologically and emotionally intense that they are revisited only rarely. The late Roger Ebert wrote that Come and See “is one of the most devastating films ever about anything, and in it, the survivors must envy the dead,” while Mark Cousins called Come and See “the greatest war film ever made.” Both are correct.

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The Flag Was Still There In “Rebels: These Free And Independent States #1” On The Wednesday Run

And the rocket’s red glare!

The bombs bursting in air!

OK. We’re talking about comic books, not the star-spangles banner of the United States of America – although the two, seemingly disparate elements, intermingle today.

We’ve all talked about his before: one of the great things about comic books is that they are ever-malleable in terms of art, design and story. Regardless of distribution method, or frequency, or shape, or size (all great aspects inherent to comics) there’s also no effects budget to hinder the artistic look of an individual issue. There’s no defined wall, no genre that a writer can’t hurdle a story over – or gloriously crash one through!

There’s proof through the night (and day) of this belief every time we pick up and read a comic book.

Today is Wednesday. It’s new comic book arrival day, a day all comic book readers eagerly look forward to. Let’s celebrate the first issue of a new volume of stories set in America’s nascent past that proves this point – again.

Let’s celebrate Rebels: These Free And Independent States #1

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Guardians of the Galaxy Season Two Animated Shorts

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Just as the first season of Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy animated series began with a gauntlet of shorts on Disney X-D, so does the second season. Come on, with a movie sequel coming, you knew a second animated season was coming as well, right? Meet me after the jump for my thoughts…

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Creations of Chaos: Turning Point 1997-2008

In this edition of Creations of Chaos, we’re talking photography bans, saving trees, and killing curiosity, as I delve into the Hayao Miyazaki focused book, Turning Point 1997-2008.

Turning Point

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Beauty and the Beast breaks records in its opening weekend

The word of the weekend is huge, as Disney’s latest live action adaptation of an animated classic made all the money. Here’s what went down:

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Beauty and the Beast was an absolute monster at the box office, debuting at number one with an astounding estimate of $174 million. That’s the biggest March opening in history, breaking the record set last March by Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice’s $166 million. Reviews have been strong, hype has been in overdrive and there’s a lack of family films in theatres at the moment – all factors that have clearly made this film a hit. It should definitely have legs over the coming weeks, so it will be interesting to see how high Beauty and the Beast will climb during its theatrical run.

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Gilbert Reviews Edwin Herbert’s Historical Mystery: ‘Mythos Christos’

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I was offered a chance to read and review a novel written by Edwin Herbert. The write-up that his publicist sent was quite intriguing and something that was definitely up my alley: Vatican conspiracies, history, mystery, and adventure. Edwin Herbert is president of his local free thought society and has been a regular op-ed newspaper columnist on topics concerning science, skepticism, and the mythical roots of various religions. Mythos Christos is his debut novel. Meet me after the jump. Read the rest of this entry

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