The Ten Percent: Come and See (1985)

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“Ninety percent of everything is crud.” – Theodore Sturgeon

Welcome back to “The Ten Percent,” a regular column where every other week K. Dale Koontz and I take a look at the inverse of Sturgeon’s Law; in other words, the small portion of everything which is not crud. So many films premiere each year, but only a very few are remembered and revered years later. That’s not a matter of genre – the Ten Percent is a big tent, with plenty of room for comedy, drama, horror, animation, musical, science fiction and many more. But admission into the tent is not easy to come by. Films in this category last because they are high quality productions which demand more of their viewer than simple passive reception.

Elim Klimov’s Come and See (1985) takes its place in an unusual corner of the Ten Percent. A place for works of art that are so powerful, so honest, and so terrible that they absolutely must be seen, but which are also so psychologically and emotionally intense that they are revisited only rarely. The late Roger Ebert wrote that Come and See “is one of the most devastating films ever about anything, and in it, the survivors must envy the dead,” while Mark Cousins called Come and See “the greatest war film ever made.” Both are correct.

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The Flag Was Still There In “Rebels: These Free And Independent States #1” On The Wednesday Run

And the rocket’s red glare!

The bombs bursting in air!

OK. We’re talking about comic books, not the star-spangles banner of the United States of America – although the two, seemingly disparate elements, intermingle today.

We’ve all talked about his before: one of the great things about comic books is that they are ever-malleable in terms of art, design and story. Regardless of distribution method, or frequency, or shape, or size (all great aspects inherent to comics) there’s also no effects budget to hinder the artistic look of an individual issue. There’s no defined wall, no genre that a writer can’t hurdle a story over – or gloriously crash one through!

There’s proof through the night (and day) of this belief every time we pick up and read a comic book.

Today is Wednesday. It’s new comic book arrival day, a day all comic book readers eagerly look forward to. Let’s celebrate the first issue of a new volume of stories set in America’s nascent past that proves this point – again.

Let’s celebrate Rebels: These Free And Independent States #1

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Guardians of the Galaxy Season Two Animated Shorts

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Just as the first season of Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy animated series began with a gauntlet of shorts on Disney X-D, so does the second season. Come on, with a movie sequel coming, you knew a second animated season was coming as well, right? Meet me after the jump for my thoughts…

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Creations of Chaos: Turning Point 1997-2008

In this edition of Creations of Chaos, we’re talking photography bans, saving trees, and killing curiosity, as I delve into the Hayao Miyazaki focused book, Turning Point 1997-2008.

Turning Point

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Beauty and the Beast breaks records in its opening weekend

The word of the weekend is huge, as Disney’s latest live action adaptation of an animated classic made all the money. Here’s what went down:

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Beauty and the Beast was an absolute monster at the box office, debuting at number one with an astounding estimate of $174 million. That’s the biggest March opening in history, breaking the record set last March by Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice’s $166 million. Reviews have been strong, hype has been in overdrive and there’s a lack of family films in theatres at the moment – all factors that have clearly made this film a hit. It should definitely have legs over the coming weeks, so it will be interesting to see how high Beauty and the Beast will climb during its theatrical run.

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Gilbert Reviews Edwin Herbert’s Historical Mystery: ‘Mythos Christos’

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I was offered a chance to read and review a novel written by Edwin Herbert. The write-up that his publicist sent was quite intriguing and something that was definitely up my alley: Vatican conspiracies, history, mystery, and adventure. Edwin Herbert is president of his local free thought society and has been a regular op-ed newspaper columnist on topics concerning science, skepticism, and the mythical roots of various religions. Mythos Christos is his debut novel. Meet me after the jump. Read the rest of this entry

Pump Up The Jam: March 17, 2017

This edition of Pump Up The Jam features Synthwave (The ‘80s Revival), Blood and Glass, The Cairo Gang, Bogart, Rubella Ballet, and Casper Skulls.

Blood and Glass

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Beauty and the Beast looks to top the box office

It’s going to be a beautiful weekend for one big new release at the box office, while all other films are going to have to take a back seat. Want to see our predictions? Be our guest:

Beauty and the Beast

Beauty and the Beast is the live-action adaptation of the classic Disney animated film. Emma Watson stars as Belle, while Dan Stevens takes on the role of the Beast. Hype has been in overdrive for this film, so even though reviews haven’t been great, families are definitely going to come out in abundance for this theatrical experience. Look for a huge debut for Beauty and the Beast, with $150 million and an obvious first place showing.

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Hit The Road With ‘American Gods: Shadows #1’ On The Wednesday Run

Gods, immigrants, the old world, the twenty-first century, road trips, deceits, magic and battles.

Under the pen of award-winning author, Neil Gaiman, you know that those seemingly disparate elements will make for a compelling story.

Heck, if you’ve read any of his comic book stories, let along his novels, it sounds a lot like the stuff you probably have in your long box collection: The Sandman, Stardust, Miracleman and Death: The High Cost of Living.

But this time, we’re talking about his Hugo, Bram Stoker, Locus, World Fantasy and Nebula Award-winning novel, American Gods – which, finally, gets adapted into the comic book forum in a new monthly series from Dark Horse Comics.

And the writer and artists behind that adaptation are as star-powered as the author who penned the original prose.

Today sees the release of American Gods: Shadows #1!

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True Crime Corner: Marie Noe

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On this edition of True Crime Corner, I thought we could take a look into murdering mom Marie Noe. Her nefarious history includes giving birth to ten children, one of whom was delivered stillborn, and another lived just a few hours. What happened to the other eight little ones she took home from the hospital?

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