Category Archives: movies

31 Days of Horror 2016: Bone Tomahawk

Well we’re deep into the spooky season with Halloween just a few days away. You’ve watched Friday the 13th and The Exorcist. You were beaten senseless by The Walking Dead’s latest round of audience trolling. Maybe it’s time to mix it up, head off the well-trodden path and get a little weird with your scary. So I give you a few words to roll around in anticipation. Kurt Russell. Western. Cannibal troglodytes. Piqued your curiosity? Then saddle up, hoss. We’re gonna ride and have a jaw about Bone Tomahawk.

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Strike A Match, Ignite An “Inferno”

Things are looking to heat up at the box office this weekend, with the return of a successful franchise. Will this new installment set fire or flame out? Here’s our prediction:


Inferno is a brand new Robert Langdon film, starring Tom Hanks and directed by Ron Howard. The previous films, 2006’s The DaVinci Code and 2009’s Angels and Demons, made over $200 million  and $100 million respectively, and this film will likely fall slightly lower than the last movie, considering its horrible reviews (27% fresh at Rotten Tomatoes as of this writing). Hanks is coming off Sully, which was critically and commercially successful, along with a strong showing on last week’s Saturday Night Live, so Inferno should at least have a decent opening. Look for a first place showing with $28 million.

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31 Days Of Horror: What To Watch On Netflix Canada


Halloween falls on a Monday this year which means that if you have to get up early the next day, you probably will be too tired from a weekend of festivities to do much of anything except sit on the couch and eat leftover candy. Or maybe Halloween parties aren’t your thing and you’d much rather watch something scary on TV.

I remember trying to rent some scary movies for Halloween during the death throes of the video rental chain stores and it was not a pretty sight. Thankfully, we have Netflix now.

Here’s a list of some of Netflix’s best offerings for this, the spookiest of all weekends.
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31 Days Of Horror 2016: Guest Writer Monica S. Kuebler on The Spierig Brothers’ Daybreakers (2009)

Do you have a favourite monster? If you do, you probably understand the lengths one will go to satiate that monster-mania.

Me? I love vampires. I don’t know what vampire book or film I saw first. I no longer remember when this lifelong love affair began. When I look back now, it seems like it was always there. I’m not selective in my vampire love either, though I do worship at the altar of a good story; I like the feral inhuman ones, the haughty aristocrats, the grotesque parasites, the misunderstood monsters, and even some of the teenage incarnations. Perhaps I love vampires for their versatility. They are a monster with a thousand stories.

In recent years, I’ve found myself fascinated with films and books that flip the “few bloodsuckers feeding off humanity (and must be destroyed)” narrative upside down and, instead, offer up detailed, well-thought-out vampire societies. One movie of that ilk that I keep coming back to is 2009’s Daybreakers, directed by The Spierig Brothers.

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31 Days of Horror 2016: When comes the horror remake

It’s in the air, isn’t it? The horror of Halloween. The last few weeks have seen Biff Bam Pop spreading out usual horrific cheer with our 31 Days of Horror. Much of it has been celebrating our favorite movies and tv shows. Here and now, though, is where we’ll look ahead a little bit, to what could be horrific for all the wrong reasons.

The horror remake.

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Ouija: Origin of Evil looks to take out Jack Reacher, Madea this weekend

We’re heading into Halloween horror film time, and there’s a big new release looking for your dollars this weekend. Will it hit the big money, or will one of Hollywood’s most bankable stars spoil the fun. Here’s our prediction:

Ouija: Origin of Evil is a sequel to the 2014 original that managed to make $50 million during its release. While no huge names are attached to this follow-up, there’s some decent buzz surrounding the film, which is said to be quite scary, even for a PG-13 rated movie. People want to get their horror on as October comes to a close, and this is the movie that will help them do it. Look for a first place showing with $23 million.

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Trailer Time: Logan (UPDATED w/Red Band Trailer)

Holy shit. This looks incredible. That’s all I’m going to say.

Logan is out March 3rd, 2017.

31 Days of Halloween: The Gorgon (1964)

Sometimes you have a history with a movie before you even experience it. This is becoming an increasingly difficult challenge in an age when everything’s on demand or one YouTube click away. In my youth, weird cult movies were things that were whispered about with reverence, only experienced in the pages of cinema books such as Danny Peary’s Cult Movies books, or by flipping through old issues of Fangoria magazine. I remember overnight camp counselors going bananas over The Rocky Horror Picture Show, back when you could catch screenings of it once in a blue moon in the theatre only, which is arguably where that film belongs.

I have the same history with Hammer’s The Gorgon.

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31 Days of Horror 2016: Guest writer Lindsay Gibb on Nicolas Cage


Nicolas Cage has the capacity to be the master of whatever genre he chooses. He’s tackled many, among them comedy, drama, adventure, sci-fi, con capers, crime films, and, of course, action. The films in his late ’90s action trilogy — The Rock, Con Air and Face/Off — are still cited as classics and, at the time, came out of nowhere for an actor who had barely touched the genre.

But when you think of horror movies, Nicolas Cage isn’t the first guy that comes to mind.

Last year I released a book, National Treasure: Nicolas Cage (2015), in which I argue that the reason Cage is a national treasure (in just about any nation) is due to this ability to be everything and convincingly take on all genres. Not only that, but his willingness and seemingly incessant need to try everything at least once (but usually at least three times) results in a diverse filmography and a fascinating collection of acting styles.

Trying new genres fuels him and yet, when I was writing this book and watching all 72 of his films (he’s now up to 78. Yep, he’s released six movies since my book came out a year ago. Prolific!), one genre that was suspiciously light was horror. Read the rest of this entry

By the Book: The Girl on the Train


One thing you can always count on in Hollywood is people are always looking for “the next <fill in the blank>,” so when the 2012 novel and 2014 film adaption Gone Girl both made a truckload of money, it’s no surprise that people started looking for the “next Gone Girl.”  A lot of critics and movie-goers think they have found it in The Girl on the Train, the 2015 thriller written by British author Paula Hawkins and fast-tracked into a Universal film released a few weeks ago. With its disappearing woman, emphasis on unreliable, first-person narrators, and a twisted, corkscrew ending, it’s easy to see why. But is it really the next Gone Girl? And how does the novel hold up to it’s movie adaptation? Find out after the break! (And spoilers ahead!)

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