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Category Archives: books

The Librarians: The Mother Goose Chase

Lost magical spells, nightmare nursery rhymes, and a cracked egg that could end the universe; it’s up to The Librarians to save the world once again, in the book, The Mother Goose Chase.

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Anne with an E

Depression, bullying, robbery, and child abuse. It should come as no surprise that they are some of the topics explored in Breaking Bad producer Moira Walley- Beckett’s newest television series. What is surprising, is that the new series is a re-imagining of the wholesome novel, cherished by generations, Anne of Green Gables. It’s the Netflix series, Anne with an E.

Anne with an E Poster

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The Ten Percent – Gaiman’s Pages

“Ninety percent of everything is crud.” – Theodore Sturgeon

 

Greetings and welcome to another installment of The Ten Percent! Every two weeks (well, roughly), Ensley F. Guffey and I use this space to take a look at the inverse of Sturgeon’s Law; in other words, the small portion of everything which is not crud. Viewed as a whole, Sturgeon was, sadly, right – the vast majority of movies, television, writing, art, and so on really is crud (trust me on this, I just saw Baywatch for the movie show I co-host) – but there has always been that slim li’l piece of heaven. The Ten Percent crosses genre boundaries, mostly because these rare gems are high quality productions which demand more of their viewer than just passive reception.

In my last column, I discussed Neil Gaiman’s American Gods which, at the time, was just about to begin its run on the Starz network. I am currently caught up on episodes and am also avidly following the comic version. American Gods just makes me smile and the high quality of the work in multiple Media (hi, Gillian Anderson!) is a revelation of how magnificent storytelling can completely transcend genre. The show has already been renewed for a second season, which reassures me that they’ll take their time telling this convoluted tale.

Much of Gaiman’s work belongs in the Ten Percent.* The last column touched on his best-known work, Vertigo’s Sandman, and if you haven’t read that (slowly, thoughtfully, and with great deliberate intent), you have an amazing treat in store for you and I’m jealous that you get to experience the Endless for the first time. However, I wanted to bring your attention to several other works of Gaiman’s that you might not know about. Yes, he’s written for Babylon 5, Doctor Who, and several of his works have been adapted for the silver screen with more on the way. But why wait?

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True Crime Corner: Arthur Shawcross

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The areas near rivers are sometimes used as body dumps for serial killers. While Gary Ridgway favored locations around the Green River, another man frequented New York’s Genesee River, becoming known as The Genesee River Killer. Today on True Crime Corner, who was Arthur Shawcross?

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True Crime Corner: Leonard Lake and Charles Ng

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The last True Crime Corner featured the killing cousins who perpetrated The Hillside Strangler murders. In this edition, I’ll introduce you to another dangerous duo, Leonard Lake and Charles Ng.

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Gilbert Reviews Teri Wilson’s Romantic Comedy, ‘Royally Roma’

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Have I mentioned how much I enjoy being the senior writer for Biff Bam Pop? I get to interview the most talented people. Lately, I’ve been doing book reviews for the site, and while I’ve enjoyed reading all the books assigned to me, Royally Roma by Teri Wilson has been my favorite by far. Set in the eternal city of Rome, Teri Wilson takes her readers on a spectacular adventure of mistaken identity. Meet me after the jump for the review. Read the rest of this entry

True Crime Corner: The Hillside Strangler

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This week on True Crime Corner, the Hillside Strangler is a bit of a misnomer for the killers responsible for terrorizing California in 1977 and 1978. In fact, the rampage was a family affair, perpetrated by two cousins. Who were these men?

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Camp Comes Alive in TwoMorrows’ ‘Hero-A-Go-Go’!

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With the debut of the 1966 Batman television series, a craze of camp swept through pop culture, especially comic books, and would   infect the world for more than a few years. Whether you lived through this era, or it’s brand new to you, this is the book that has it all: Hero-A-Go-Go! from TwoMorrows, a swinging journey through nostalgia for pop culture and comics fans alike!

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True Crime Corner: Donald Harvey

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In this edition of True Crime Corner we have a serial killer, who made headlines in the 80s, back in the news within the last few weeks. Describing himself as an angel of death, Donald Harvey met his end in prison, when it’s believed he was assaulted by another inmate who entered his cell. What did Harvey do to find himself behind bars?

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The Ten Percent: ‘American Gods’

“Ninety percent of everything is crud.” – Theodore Sturgeon

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Greetings and welcome to another installment of The Ten Percent! Every two weeks (well, roughly), Ensley F. Guffey and I use this space to take a look at the inverse of Sturgeon’s Law; in other words, the small portion of everything which is not crud. Viewed as a whole, Sturgeon was, sadly, right – the vast majority of movies, television, writing, art, and so on really is crud – but there has always been that slim slice of sublime. The Ten Percent isn’t limited by genre – I think our previous columns have proven that point – and that’s because these rare gems are high quality productions which demand more of their viewer than simple passive reception.

I have, on occasion, discussed an entry that makes the cut on The Ten Percent in more than one category, such as a book and the movie made from the book. It’s hard enough to create ONE fantastic thing; to create a Ten-Percent-worthy work in more than a single medium is truly catching lightning in a bottle.

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