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Battle of the Brands: WWE Survivor Series

Having the WWE network is what it would be like having a pizza place in my basement: I don’t always want pizza, but I’d eat it at any time and enjoy it. This is what the network does so well; it offers me something I like all the time while also being there with a nice big Sunday meal when a monthly event rolls around.
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What Happens When Revenge Isn’t Enough: ‘The Punisher’

Netflix’s first season of The Punisher picks up where Season 2 of Daredevil left off, in a world where everyone thinks Frank Castle is dead and that’s just fine with him.

Jon Bernthal as Frank Castle/The Punisher

For those entering Netflix’s Marvel universe for the first time, here’s what you need to know: Frank Castle, an ex-Marine who fought in Afghanistan, transformed into The Punisher after his family was gunned down as part of a drug deal sting operation gone bad. Frank then goes after those responsible, becoming a vicious vigilante who lives by by the code of “an eye for an eye.”
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‘They Remain’ Provides Dread and Frustration


Starring William Harper Jackson and Rebecca Henderson, They Remain is about two scientists that are helicoptered into a remote location to study strange animal behavior and environmental changes where a Manson-style cult had committed a brutal atrocity. Director Philip Gelatt weaves themes of paganism, sci-fi, and horror into a dread-filled and beautifully shot film. It’s an effective slow burn thriller that works on every level, to a point.
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31 Days of Horror: 78/52


The new documentary 78/52 dives deep into the technical aspects, meanings, anecdotes, and impact of Alfred Hitchcock’s notorious shower scene from his landmark 1960 film Psycho. (The film’s title refers to the 78 camera set ups and the 52 cuts in that scene.) Many industry luminaries lend their opinions and insights  in the film, like Peter Bogdanovich, Elijah Wood, Guillermo del Toro, Jamie Lee Curtis, Danny Elfman, Bret Easton Ellis, Mick Garris, Richard Stanley, and even Janet Leigh’s body double Marli Renfro.
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31 Days of Horror: Alone in the Dark (1982)

“All right, they’re crazy. Isn’t everybody?” – Dr. Leo Bain, Alone in the Dark

I’m a horror fan, but I’m not that crazy about slashers. That’s what makes 1982’s Alone in the Dark so special. Directed by Jack Sholder (A Nightmare on Elm Street 2: Freddy’s Revenge), the film mixes black humor with genuine scares, both of which elevate it far above the average slasher.
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31 Days of Horror: Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer

This article is part of Biff Bam Pop’s ongoing “Now Streaming on Shudder” series.

The reputation of a horror film can often loom so large that even the thought of watching it elicits fear. Such is the case with Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer. After years of hearing it was one of the most realistic and shocking cinematic depictions of a serial killer, I purposely avoided it.

After growing fond of Michael Rooker as an actor over the years, I was also worried that he would be so believable I wouldn’t be able to watch him in anything else. I finally got the nerve to tackle Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer a few weeks ago.
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31 Days of Horror: The Asphyx (1973)


Although reminiscent of the films in the Hammer Horror canon, The Asphyx was not made by that renowned studio, which makes this 1973 film an underrated curiosity from horror’s hallowed halls.
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31 Days Of Horror: Halloween III

The Halloween franchise is near and dear to my heart as Part 4 was just coming out at a time when I was jumping into horror with both feet. Michael was on the cover of Fangoria and I read my friend’s copy with much excitement. I was least familiar with Halloween since I’d only seen Part 2 on TV in pieces, but still I felt that The Return Of Michael Myers was a pretty big deal and I’d need to rent it the moment it hit my local video store. In the meantime, I had three other films to catch up on.
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Cheap Trick’s ‘We’re All Allright’ Proves They Are Exactly That


Although they may have money, fame, and hordes of adoring fans, it must be tough to be an iconic rock and roll band. Every time they release a new batch of material, they run the risk of sounding either too much like their previous selves, or not enough. Worse still is being confronted with the dreaded “return to form” cliché.

For a band like Cheap Trick, it’s even dicier. To which “form” should they return? The sardonic hard rock of their debut? The bubblegum power pop of “Dream Police”? The AOR of “The Flame”? After over four decades in the biz, they’ve covered a lot of ground, so deciding which direction to take presents an ongoing quandary that I don’t envy.
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Now Streaming On Shudder: Nicolas Roeg’s ‘The Man Who Fell To Earth’

David Bowie starred in quite a few movies during his career, including Labyrinth, Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence, and Absolute Beginners. Perhaps none is more metatextual, however, than Nicolas Roeg’s 1976 film The Man Who Fell To Earth.

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