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Category Archives: review

Review of Renegade: Martin Luther, The Graphic Biography

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I really enjoy reading graphic novels, but when Biff Bam Pop’s fearless leader asked me if I wanted to review a graphic novel about Martin Luther that was timed for the 500th anniversary of Protestant Reformation, I was at first hesitant, but then my curiosity took over. Why did Martin Luther risk his life to go against Papal edicts? Meet me after the jump for my review of Plough Publishing‘s presentation of Renegade: Martin Luther, The Graphic Biography followed by an interview with Dacia Palmerino and Andrea Grosso Ciponte. Read the rest of this entry

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31 Days of Horror 2017: Alien Toilet Monsters

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Aliens, toilets, and monsters. Three things that are all relevant to my interests. So, am I going to be interested in reviewing a comic by Carol Zara and Eric Barnett called Alien Toilet Monsters? Hell yes I am. Did the book live up to all the fantastic images the title brought to my mind? Hit the jump and find out!

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31 Days of Horror: Alone in the Dark (1982)

“All right, they’re crazy. Isn’t everybody?” – Dr. Leo Bain, Alone in the Dark

I’m a horror fan, but I’m not that crazy about slashers. That’s what makes 1982’s Alone in the Dark so special. Directed by Jack Sholder (A Nightmare on Elm Street 2: Freddy’s Revenge), the film mixes black humor with genuine scares, both of which elevate it far above the average slasher.
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31 Days of Horror: Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer

This article is part of Biff Bam Pop’s ongoing “Now Streaming on Shudder” series.

The reputation of a horror film can often loom so large that even the thought of watching it elicits fear. Such is the case with Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer. After years of hearing it was one of the most realistic and shocking cinematic depictions of a serial killer, I purposely avoided it.

After growing fond of Michael Rooker as an actor over the years, I was also worried that he would be so believable I wouldn’t be able to watch him in anything else. I finally got the nerve to tackle Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer a few weeks ago.
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31 Days of Horror: The Asphyx (1973)


Although reminiscent of the films in the Hammer Horror canon, The Asphyx was not made by that renowned studio, which makes this 1973 film an underrated curiosity from horror’s hallowed halls.
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31 Days Of Horror: Halloween III

The Halloween franchise is near and dear to my heart as Part 4 was just coming out at a time when I was jumping into horror with both feet. Michael was on the cover of Fangoria and I read my friend’s copy with much excitement. I was least familiar with Halloween since I’d only seen Part 2 on TV in pieces, but still I felt that The Return Of Michael Myers was a pretty big deal and I’d need to rent it the moment it hit my local video store. In the meantime, I had three other films to catch up on.
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TIFF 2017: High Fantasy

Jenna Bass’s latest film, High Fantasy, is a fascinating glimpse into the lives of South Africa’s multi-cultural youth. Appearing as a sort of homemade travelogue, High Fantasy is filmed as if collected from a group of friends’ various iPhones and then officially edited together afterwards.

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Songs for the Dead

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Questing! Swords! Necromancy! All of these things are completely foreign to me, sadly. Should it be sad that I’m not familiar with necromancy? I guess there is somewhat of a negative stigma attached to the esoteric art of RAISING THE DEAD. My upbringing tended to skew more science fiction and less fantasy so I was very curious about the independent comic book Songs for the Dead when it was brought to my attention. How did I feel about it? Hit the jump to find out!

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Loretta Sisco on Alice Cooper’s Paranormal

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Anyone who knows me knows that I am a huge Alice Cooper fan, from the time I raided my big brother’s room and absconded with his Alice Cooper Goes to Hell vinyl many years ago. My little Radio Shack turntable was never the same, and I loved its ability to stack multiple records for continuous listening, which was useful when I pillaged my brother’s collection for more Alice Cooper albums. Would his latest record make the stack if I still owned that beloved stereo?

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Cheap Trick’s ‘We’re All Allright’ Proves They Are Exactly That


Although they may have money, fame, and hordes of adoring fans, it must be tough to be an iconic rock and roll band. Every time they release a new batch of material, they run the risk of sounding either too much like their previous selves, or not enough. Worse still is being confronted with the dreaded “return to form” cliché.

For a band like Cheap Trick, it’s even dicier. To which “form” should they return? The sardonic hard rock of their debut? The bubblegum power pop of “Dream Police”? The AOR of “The Flame”? After over four decades in the biz, they’ve covered a lot of ground, so deciding which direction to take presents an ongoing quandary that I don’t envy.
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