Category Archives: review

Now Streaming On Shudder: Nicolas Roeg’s ‘The Man Who Fell To Earth’

David Bowie starred in quite a few movies during his career, including Labyrinth, Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence, and Absolute Beginners. Perhaps none is more metatextual, however, than Nicolas Roeg’s 1976 film The Man Who Fell To Earth.

Read the rest of this entry

Advertisements

Here’s What’s Fantastic About “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them”

Throw on some jazz, pour a glass of Giggle Water, and curl up with your favorite bowtruckle, we’re talking Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, on this spoiler-free review.

fantastic-beasts-poster

Read the rest of this entry

31 Days of Horror 2016: Kakurenbo: Hide & Seek

It’s the horror film that will actually make you want to turn off the lights. On today’s installment of “31 Days of Horror,” it’s the short, Japanese animated film, Kakurenbo: Hide & Seek.  

kakurenbo_filmposter

Read the rest of this entry

“Marvel’s Luke Cage” Is Bold, Bulletproof Entertainment

luke-cage-review-header-graphic
After two seasons of Daredevil and one of Jessica Jones, do TV junkies still have room in their hearts for another member of The Defenders team? With their new series Marvel’s Luke Cage, Netflix is hoping the answer to that question is a resounding “yes.”
Read the rest of this entry

Review: “Suicide Squad” Is All Guts, No Glory, And That’s OK

Suicide Squad posterYou don’t have to go very far to get an opinion on the new Suicide Squad film.  Chances are, you hit the Internet and the first thing that comes up are the negative reviews. And there are a lot of them.

It’s a shame, really. All of us comic book and pop culture fans wanted the film to be great, didn’t we? We wanted to be thrilled at the idea of a group of hardened criminals, forced to work together for a greater good. We wanted to see the new twists and turns of the DC Expanded Universe (DCEU) as its film empire gets firmly rooted, takes shape, ushers us all forward. Hell, we wanted to see Jared Leto’s crazy-looking Joker!

The truth is the film is certainly flawed in its story. You just can’t hide that fact. But the film is not as bad as the many reviews have been saying, thank goodness.

Suicide Squad is not pretty, but it’s definitely got some guts – and a lot of heart – in it.

Read the rest of this entry

Marie Gilbert’s Review of My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2

my-big-fat-greek-wedding-sequel-poster

I come from a huge Italian family. We are loud, animated, rowdy and generous to a fault, so I really enjoyed the original My Big Fat Greek Wedding which was released in 2002 because it was comforting to know that crazy didn’t just run amok in our family. When my friend asked me to join her on Friday for dinner and a movie, I was excited to see if the sequel, My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2 was just as good as the original. Do sequels ever disappoint us? Find out after the jump. Read the rest of this entry

Wim Wenders at TIFF: Wings of Desire

Wings of Desire, Wim Wenders’ final fictional film from the 1980s, is lighter than a feather. The wispy gates of heaven open to an overcast Berlin in the twilight of The Cold War. Angels float through the streets and listen to the thoughts of the city’s many lonely characters.

Read the rest of this entry

Wim Wenders at TIFF: Paris, Texas

paris-texas-1986

Wim Wenders’ visionary Palme d’Or winning film Paris, Texas is the culmination of the director’s many years of hard work capturing life on the road. This poetic study of what it means for one to belong in the world transcends language and reality.

Read the rest of this entry

Wim Wenders at TIFF: The American Friend

vlcsnap-2011-08-08-22h13m22s205

Wim Wenders’ neo-noir thriller, The American Friend, looks like it was cut from the same cloth as other films from the genre. When viewing the film in 2016, it’s hard not to make stylistic connections to such titles as: The French Connection, Chinatown, and Point Blank. However, what makes The American Friend stand out from its counterparts is that it doesn’t concern itself with trying to fulfill a mysterious plotline.

Read the rest of this entry

Winter at TIFF: Wim Wenders’ Early Shorts

reverseangle

As part of their expansive retrospective on the exceptional German director Wim Wenders, The TIFF Bell Lightbox delivers a rare opportunity to see the man’s early short films as one screening. Most of these films date back to the late 1960s when Wenders was a film student in Munich. The films are the collected diaries of a young filmmaker experimenting with the medium, searching for his voice. While many of the films feel like fragmented snapshots of little consequence, it is evident that a vision is starting to form. Viewing the compilation in the context of Wenders’ later work, it is miraculous to see the jump in craftsmanship in such a short amount of time.

Read the rest of this entry

%d bloggers like this: