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Category Archives: movie review

The Unreal Reality of ‘Fake Blood’


We live in a time when spoiler alerts (and complaints about spoilers) abound. Still, some movies do rely on audiences knowing as little as possible beforehand, not because they are indicative of lazy storytelling methods, but because the journey itself is part of the enjoyment factor. This lack of foreknowledge favors the kinds of documentaries that allow the viewer to accompany the film’s narrator on his or her quest for some form of the truth.

Such narrative journeys can be suspenseful or downright creepy; witness 2011’s Resurrect Dead: The Mystery of the Toynbee Tiles, 2012’s The Imposter, or most famously, 2010’s Catfish. Comparing Fake Blood to Catfish makes me feel like this review is already giving too much away, but, Spoiler Alert! It’s a risk I’m willing to take. Read the rest of this entry

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‘Mohawk’ is Intense and Essential Cinema


Mohawk is the story of a woman from the Mohawk nation, named Oak, taking on a platoon of American soldiers after they murder everyone she holds dear during the War of 1812. Shot on location in Syracuse, New York with actual members of the Mohawk tribe, the film is a bloody, deep dive into one of the many corners of American history we tend to gloss over in school. Read the rest of this entry

‘Looking Glass’ Looks Good, But Is Minor Nicolas Cage


Nicolas Cage is having quite the year. It’s only the beginning of February and he’s already had a lot of buzz: There is the high energy, pitch-black comedy about parents trying to kill their children which hit theatres in January (Mom & Dad), one of the best reviewed films at Sundance (Mandy), and a film festival dedicated to him in Glasgow.

Sadly, the least exciting thing about 2018 so far for Cage is Looking Glass, a thriller directed by Tim Hunter, a prolific TV director who also directed the 1986 Crispin Glover/Keanu Reeves film River’s Edge. Read the rest of this entry

Supernatural Slasher ‘Inoperable’ Needs Saving


Directed by Christopher Lawrence Chapman, 2017’s Inoperable stars Danielle Harris (Halloween 4 and 5) as a traffic accident victim who wakes up in a seemingly abandoned hospital, during a category 5 hurricane in Tampa, Florida. Dark forces have been awakened within the hospital by the hurricane and Harris’ character must find a way out before the hurricane ends or be trapped forever. Read the rest of this entry

Victor Crowley Returns Today!


“It’s not a remake. It’s not a sequel. And it’s not based on a Japanese one,” claimed the original poster for Adam Green’s 2006 horror comedy Hatchet. The movie revived the fun and gore of the best 1980s slasher films brilliantly and spawned two wildly bloody sequels. Hatchet III dropped in 2013 and since then everything in Honey Island Swamp has been quiet.
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‘D.O.A.: A Right of Passage’ is a Messy, Essential Document of Punk

The documentary D.O.A. was filmed almost guerrilla style, funded by High Times magazine, with director Lech Kowalski following the Sex Pistols on the doomed 1978 tour of America. The band didn’t want him there, Johnny Rotten was suspicious of High Times, and as it runes out, the Pistols would fall apart after just seven gigs. Despite all that, Kowalski captured an important moment in rock history and peppered it with a few other notable acts.

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‘Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle’ Is a Treat for the Whole Family

With a holiday season as cold as this one has been, a trip to the movies with my family was a perfect way to spend an afternoon. Here in the town of Cobourg, Ontario, we have a better than average Rainbow Cinema. The screens aren’t huge, the seats don’t recline and the sound doesn’t make your eyes bleed, but the popcorn is fresh, the lines are short and the pre-show and trailers clock in at five minutes max. Overall, its a perfect place for my wife and I to take our two kids (boy, 6 and girl, 9) to enjoy a movie that doesn’t require 3D, IMAX or any other ballyhoo to be enjoyed.

I wasn’t sure what to expect from this new, updated Jumanji flick, but it did have a few things going for it right off the top. First, The Rock (sorry, Dwayne Johnson). I’m a mark and thus far, with the possible exception of Doom, I have yet to not enjoy a movie that he was in. Second, Jack Black. I haven’t seen all his movies, but School of Rock will always have a spot on my shelf. And, third, Karen Gillan. Karen and I go way back to her days as Amy Pond, so seeing her get a second big Hollywood gig after Guardians of the Galaxy is a treat. I couldn’t tell you anything about the director and I’d only seen a few trailers, so stars aside, my expectations were measured to say the least.
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Teenage Spidey Swing Strong In Spider-Man-Homecoming – A Film Review

Editor’s note: So, I f’d up months ago. My friend, J. Michael Trautmann, wrote an excellent look at Spider-Man: Homecoming when it was released, and I totally gaffed on getting it up. Rather than leave it to the ether, I’m really happy to post it now (with apologies to JMT). Spider-Man: Homecoming is doing gangbuster business on VOD and Blu-ray (see more here), so luckily, his work remains timeless, even with my mistake. 

OK, so it’s been enough time and everyone has seen Spider-Man: Homecoming, who cares by now. Here are my thoughts on the latest Sony adaptation of Marvel’s (and my) favorite character, Spider-Man. Spoilers a plenty, for those of you slacking.

Spider-Man homecoming

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‘Somebody’s Darling’ Shows Promise, But Ultimately Falls Flat

Set in 2006, Somebody’s Darling takes place on a university campus and centers on a fraternity house that throws posh cocktail parties instead of keggers. The frat brothers put on an air of Southern sophistication, but it doesn’t take long before we see a darker underbelly to the house.
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Holiday Gift Guide 2017: Ed Wood’s ‘The Violent Years’ Gets a 4k Restoration

“These Aren’t Kids. They’re Morons!”

Alamo Drafthouse’s The American Genre Film Archive (AGFA), the world’s largest non-profit film archive, have teamed with Something Weird Video to bring us a lost film from the so-called world’s worst director. You either know writer/producer/actor/director Ed Wood from the Tim Burton film or from his magnum opus Plan 9 From Outer Space. You may have even seen his films skewered on Mystery Science Theater 3000.
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