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Let Us Now Praise Noise: Mid-January Edition

This week: Dark Palms, Iron Reagan, Gatecreeper, All Pigs Must Die, Mammoth Grinder, David Shire
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‘D.O.A.: A Right of Passage’ is a Messy, Essential Document of Punk

The documentary D.O.A. was filmed almost guerrilla style, funded by High Times magazine, with director Lech Kowalski following the Sex Pistols on the doomed 1978 tour of America. The band didn’t want him there, Johnny Rotten was suspicious of High Times, and as it runes out, the Pistols would fall apart after just seven gigs. Despite all that, Kowalski captured an important moment in rock history and peppered it with a few other notable acts.

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Let Us Now Praise Noise: Late December 2017 Edition

Prayers

In my last column of 2017, I’ll talk about Prayers, Corrosion of Conformity, Big Star, and L.A.M.F. See you in 2018!
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Tim Murr Lists His Faves of 2017

Lifeforce

Oh 2017, what happened? I remember looking forward to ’16 ending, with high hopes for the coming year, but then Trump shat all over the country and… no, positivity only here. Only the best stuff of the last year!
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‘Somebody’s Darling’ Shows Promise, But Ultimately Falls Flat

Set in 2006, Somebody’s Darling takes place on a university campus and centers on a fraternity house that throws posh cocktail parties instead of keggers. The frat brothers put on an air of Southern sophistication, but it doesn’t take long before we see a darker underbelly to the house.
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Holiday Gift Guide 2017: Ed Wood’s ‘The Violent Years’ Gets a 4k Restoration

“These Aren’t Kids. They’re Morons!”

Alamo Drafthouse’s The American Genre Film Archive (AGFA), the world’s largest non-profit film archive, have teamed with Something Weird Video to bring us a lost film from the so-called world’s worst director. You either know writer/producer/actor/director Ed Wood from the Tim Burton film or from his magnum opus Plan 9 From Outer Space. You may have even seen his films skewered on Mystery Science Theater 3000.
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Now Let Us Praise Noise: December 1, 2017

This week: Brass Hearse, The Obsessed, Boson
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Let Us Now Praise Noise: November 18, 2017

This week: John Carpenter, All Pigs Must Die, Cable, Low Estate, Amenra, True Ghouls/Sea Ghouls

John Carpenter, Anthology; Movie Themes 1974-1998: Available now (Sacred Bones Records)

There’s almost nothing more synonymous with John Carpenter’s film than the music he composed to accompany them. Is there any score more famous, recognizable, and chilling then his theme for 1978’s Halloween? It evokes a response even if you haven’t seen the film. What about the creeptastic music for The FogAnthology is a career-spanning 13 tracks, and while that doesn’t cover every film, every film covered is gold. I don’t have a record store nearby and had to order my copy; Amazon has the CD for $11.99 and the vinyl for $17.99. Carpenter is currently touring North America (fingers crossed I get to see him).

All Pigs Must Die, Hostage Animal: Available now (Southern Lord Records)

All Pigs Must Die satisfies my taste in the more extreme end of hardcore/metal, where I tend to get weary fast, but Hostage Animal has a staying power that I’d equate with newer Napalm Death. As intelligent as it is brutal, Hostage Animal is fierce, well-produced, dynamic and doesn’t overstay its welcome.

Cable, It Cost Me Everything 1994-1995: Available now (Atomic Action)

The Rockville CT four-piece Cable exploded out of the gates in 1994 and would go on to be an important name in East Coast metalcore. It Cost Me Everything brings together the early, rare, and out-of-print recordings from the band’s infancy and it’s nothing to sleep on. The abrasive emo/noise/hardcore sound will appeal to fans of groups like Unsane.

Low Estate, The Covert Cult Of Death: Available now (The Flenser)

I covered Low Estate’s single, “The Rope,” two columns back and now the whole album is available for purchase (highest of recommendations) and you can preview it over at Metal Sucks where they’re streaming the entire album. Low Estate mix black metal and ’90s hardcore in an intoxicating cocktail of metal bliss.

Amenra, “Children Of The Eye” music video, directed by Wim Reygaert, from Mass VI: Available now

Produced by Billy Anderson, who previously worked with Neurosis, Cathedral, and Sleep, among others, Belgium’s Amenra unleash their newest album Mass VI, an emotional slab of blackened doom that has moments of real beauty. Accompanying the album is a gorgeous, scary, ritualistic video for the single “Children Of The Eye,” directed by Wim Reygaert. It starts slow and quiet, but builds dramatically.

True Ghouls/Sea Ghouls, Some Ghouls split EP: Available now (Blank City Records)

Both True Ghouls and Sea Ghouls hail from Los Angeles and teamed up for this very cool split EP for a Halloween release. It’s available on vinyl and digital with great cover art that’s a send up of the Rolling Stones’ Some Girls LP. You can stream True Ghouls’ “Muscles and Bugs” at New Noise and Sea Ghouls’ “Warren” at Ghetto Blaster. True Ghouls give us a John Carpenter-esque trip hop while Sea Ghouls give us more rootsy rock, providing a nice balance of sounds and influences that work well together.

 

‘They Remain’ Provides Dread and Frustration


Starring William Harper Jackson and Rebecca Henderson, They Remain is about two scientists that are helicoptered into a remote location to study strange animal behavior and environmental changes where a Manson-style cult had committed a brutal atrocity. Director Philip Gelatt weaves themes of paganism, sci-fi, and horror into a dread-filled and beautifully shot film. It’s an effective slow burn thriller that works on every level, to a point.
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31 Days of Horror: ‘Hellraiser’ at 30


Author, artist, and playwright Clive Barker made his directorial debut on September 18, 1987. He was adapting his own novel The Hellbound Heart, which would become the seminal work of horror cinematic art known as Hellraiser. Barker had no experience as a film director, but after two disappointing adaptations of his work (Transmutations and Rawhead Rex) he was determined to direct his own work and get it right.

In 1987 there was still room for innovation in horror cinema and though the slashers that ruled the day were already beginning to be a bit repetitious, there were still high points. 1987 alone had plenty of iconic films: Kathryn Bigelow’s Near Dark, Michele Soavi’s Stage Fright, John Carpenter’s Prince Of Darkness, and Sam Raimi’s Evil Dead 2, just to name a few. No film, though, came out of left field and blew them all off the road like Hellraiser.
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