Advertisements

Blog Archives

Heroes and Villains – Reviewing The Week’s Marvels 3-1-2017

amar1

This week in Heroes and Villains our selection of new Marvel Comics includes new beginnings and continuations. Meet me after the jump for my thoughts on Avengers #5, Monsters Unleashed #4, The Unstoppable Wasp #3, America #1, and Marvel’s Spider-Man: Homecoming Prelude #1… beware, spoilers ahead…

Read the rest of this entry

Advertisements

Glenn Walker Reviews X-Factor – Countdown to X-Men: Apocalypse

ax1

When most folks these days think of X-Factor, they think of that failed Simon Cowell talent show that ran for three seasons on Fox. I think of the short-lived teaming of the original X-Men that first encountered the mutant Apocalypse. Meet me after the jump for my thoughts on X-Factor: Countdown to X-Men: Apocalypse.

Read the rest of this entry

Biff Bam Pop’s It’s All Connected – Just a Kid from Brooklyn: Captain America, American Memories of World War II, and the MCU, Part II

 

Splash page from The Ultimates #1, 2002. Script by Mark Millar, art by Bryan Hitch.

Splash page from The Ultimates #1, 2002. Script by Mark Millar, art by Bryan Hitch.

In the first part of this essay, I briefly sketched the construction of American memories of World War II that began slightly before the war and continue into the 21st century. In many ways the war has become a defining part of American identity, and the dominant, triumphal memory narrative we have created about it serves to elevate American participation in the war almost to the level of the sacred, and certainly to the realm of the simple black and white, good v. evil duality that is much more comforting than any messy and contradictory reality might be. The character of Steve Rogers/Captain America is one of the more perfect cultural artifacts to illustrate this process of memory construction, and the ways in which counter-memories, which challenge the dominant narrative, inevitably influence the national mythology.

Read the rest of this entry

Avengers: Ultron Revolution S03 E04: Under Siege

av1

Based on one of the greatest adventures of Earth’s mightiest heroes, this episode of “Marvel’s Avengers: Ultron Revolution” follows Baron Zemo and the Masters of Evil as they attack our heroes in their own headquarters. Meet me after the jump for my thoughts on “Under Siege.”

Read the rest of this entry

The Avenging Spider-Man

av1

There seem to be two types of people in this world – folks who think Spider-Man should be in the Avengers, and folks who think the wall crawler should not be an Avenger. Where do you stand on the issue? In the comics, the web-slinger has been one of Earth’s Mightiest for some time now, but it took decades to happen. Now, Marvel’s latest animated version of Spider-Man joins the team in this weekend’s new episode of “Ultimate Spider-Man.” Meet me after the jump for my thoughts on “The Avenging Spider-Man.”

Read the rest of this entry

Tales from the Longbox – Doctor Strange #66 (1984)

Every other week, Jason Shayer will highlight an issue or a run of issues pulled from the horde of comic book long boxes that occupy more room in his house than his wife can tolerate. Each of these reviews will delve into what made that issue or run significant as well as discuss the creative personalities behind the work. “Long Box” refers to the lengthy, white cardboard boxes most comics find themselves stored within – bagged, alphabetized and numerically ordered.

drstrangemaster6601Doctor Strange – Master of the Mystical Arts #66
“The Chosen One”
Writer: Roger Stern
Artists: Paul Smith/Terry Austin

You may recall my previous posts on Captain America, Doctor Strange, and Amazing Spider-Man that praised writer Roger Stern, and I’m going to do it again. Stern was one of the more prolific Marvel 1980s writers and one that is truly under appreciated. His memorable run on Doctor Strange was also complimented by great artists like Marshal Rogers and Paul Smith.

In this standalone tale, Doctor Strange was recruited by an order of monks to find the next reincarnation of their spiritual leader. Using his mystical talents, Doctor Stephen Strange found him in the form of Arnie, a greens-keeper for a local golf course. After he passed a few simple tests, Strange believed this young man had natural mystical talents, but his carefree attitude didn’t line up with that of a spiritual leader. Read the rest of this entry

Tainted Love for the DC Comics Trinity

stalk1Last February I talked about the trinity of DC Comics – Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman – and who their true loves should be. This year I’m going to take a different tact. I’ll be talking about those particularly twisted folks who think they should be their true loves. Yeah, baby, that’s right. I’ll be talking Super-Stalkers after the jump.

Read the rest of this entry

Tales from the Longbox – Captain America #253-254 (1981)

Every other week, Jason Shayer will highlight an issue or a run of issues pulled from the horde of comic book long boxes that occupy more room in his house than his wife can tolerate. Each of these reviews will delve into what made that issue or run significant as well as discuss the creative personalities behind the work. “Long Box” refers to the lengthy, white cardboard boxes most comics find themselves stored within – bagged, alphabetized and numerically ordered.

Captain America #253-254
Writer: Roger Stern
Plot: Roger Stern/John Byrne
Penciler: John Byrne
Inker: Joe Rubinstein

The teaming up of Roger Stern and John Byrne was one of those key 1980s pairings in which the sum of their total was greater than their parts. Roger Stern was writing The Incredible Hulk and editing the Uncanny X-Men while John Byrne was hitting a creative peak with Chris Claremont on the Uncanny X-Men.

Everything about Captain America #253 screamed horror, from its creepy cover to it’s atmospheric opening to its cliffhanger ending. It started with a murder in England, apparently the work of a deadly slasher who had left the victim drained of blood. The prolog had a wonderful Hammer Horror feel to it and you couldn’t help but look for Peter Cushing to walk on to one of the panels and make a cameo.

Read the rest of this entry

Tales from the Longbox – Amazing Spider-Man #243 (1983)

Every other week, Jason Shayer will highlight an issue or a run of issues pulled from the horde of comic book long boxes that occupy more room in his house than his wife can tolerate. Each of these reviews will delve into what made that issue or run significant as well as discuss the creative personalities behind the work. “Long Box” refers to the lengthy, white cardboard boxes most comics find themselves stored within – bagged, alphabetized and numerically ordered.

Amazing Spider-Man #243
“Options”
August 1983
Writer – Roger Stern
Penciler – John Romita Jr.
Inker – Dave Simons

This issue starts with a fun Archie moment with Peter locked in the arms of Amy Powell and covered in lipstick as Mary Jane Watson walks back into his life. Interestingly, it’s MJ’s sudden reappearance that has more of an effect on Peter’s life as over the next few years, she becomes a more prominent character.
Read the rest of this entry

The Amazing Spider-Man Pregame: Who Were Peter Parker’s Parents?

Who were Peter Parker’s parents? This is not a concept that many of us ever think of. As readers, as fans, we are far too invested in Aunt May, worrying over her health, and how she herself worries over Peter. And then there’s Uncle Ben, whose death is the not only the catharsis for the true origin of Spider-Man, but also the core of the famous phrase, “With great power comes great responsibility.” It is shameful but it’s true, Peter’s aunt and uncle are so important in the Spider-Man mythology, that no one hardly, if ever, gives any thought to his parents.

Who were Richard and Mary Parker? Let’s find out after the jump.
Read the rest of this entry

%d bloggers like this: