Advertisements

Blog Archives

Heroes and Villains – Reviewing The Week’s Marvels 4-26-2017

amar1

This week in Heroes and Villains our selection of new Marvel Comics is an all-female non-Secret Empire-exclusive bunch. Meet me after the jump for my reviews of Mighty Captain Marvel #4, Elektra #3, Hulk #5, Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur #18, and Mighty Thor #18… be warned, there be spoilers…

Read the rest of this entry

Advertisements

Heroes and Villains – Reviewing The Week’s Marvels 4-5-2017

amar1

This week in Heroes and Villains our selection of new Marvel Comics include the continuing battle between Kang and the Avengers, the aftermath of Inhumans Vs. X-Men and another chapter in the Captain Hydra saga. Meet me after the jump for my thoughts on Avengers #6, Royals #1, X-Men Gold #1, and Captain America Steve Rogers #15… warning, spoilers ahead…

Read the rest of this entry

Renew your love of the New Mutants with a new Epic Collection

One of my favourite comic books growing up in the 80s was The New Mutants. As a very young kid who fell in love with the X-Men’s Kitty Pryde thanks to Marvel’s Secret Wars II and Uncanny X-Men 196 (“What Was That?”), I loved seeing how the two teams interacted with one another, and reading about a team of teenagers who were older than me, but somehow still relatable. And when (SPOILER) The Beyonder killed them off in issue 37, it actually scared the hell out of me.

Co-created by writer Chris Claremont and artist Bob McLeod, the New Mutants was an easy access point for young mutant lovers, especially as the original X-Men were growing up, marrying and having children. When Stan Lee and Jack Kirby created the original series, Marvel Girl, Cyclops, Beast, Angel and Iceman were teens themselves, while the All-New, All-Different line-up was full of older and, in some case, most battle-hardened characters.  With the New Mutants, Claremont and McLeod were able to bring being a teenage mutant into the 1980s, exploring all the angst that came along with it.

New Mutants

Read the rest of this entry

Civil War II: The Oath – Endings and Beginnings

aciv1

There’s only one thing worse than a failed project, and that’s a failed project that sells itself out as an ad for the next project. That’s what the epilogue to the disappointing Civil War II really is. It’s just a prologue for the next big Marvel Comics crossover event – Secret Empire. What’s that old saying? Fool me once… Meet me after the jump for my thoughts on Civil War II; The Oath #1… because it gets much, much worse…

Read the rest of this entry

Glenn Walker Reviews Civil War II #3

aciv1

This week brings us the third issue of the Civil War II main series from Marvel Comics. In the last issue the precognitive Inhuman Ulysses predicted the future deaths of all the heroes at the hands of the Hulk. Now, the assembled so-called heroes confront Dr. Bruce Banner about the horrific havoc he has yet to wreck. Meet me after the jump for my thoughts on Civil War II #3… as always, spoiler warnings are in effect.

Read the rest of this entry

Glenn Walker Reviews X-Factor – Countdown to X-Men: Apocalypse

ax1

When most folks these days think of X-Factor, they think of that failed Simon Cowell talent show that ran for three seasons on Fox. I think of the short-lived teaming of the original X-Men that first encountered the mutant Apocalypse. Meet me after the jump for my thoughts on X-Factor: Countdown to X-Men: Apocalypse.

Read the rest of this entry

Holiday Gift Guide 2015: Comic Book Collections Part 3

We’ve been through these comic book collection lists twice already this month, but there’s more. Oh, how there’s so much more!

You can read through Part 1, which mentioned a host of great, affordable comic books for the loved ones in your life. Part 2 continued to showcase great works of sequential art – but these were ones that were slightly more expensive.

This 3rd and final installment mentions the monetary apex of some of the greatest comic book works that were released throughout the year. Yes, they’re expensive. But yes, a loved one should have them in their collection. (Also, self-love is not at all shunned here!)

I know! Times a-tickin’ and the shopping window is a-closin’’! Let’s get to it right after the jump!

Read the rest of this entry

Ensley F. Guffey On… War Comics

Cover of Battle Action 198. Joe Colquhoun, art.

Cover of Battle Action 198. Joe Colquhoun, art.

Each week, one of Biff Bam Pop’s illustrious writers will delve into one of their favorite things.  Perhaps it’s a movie or album they’ve carried with them for years.  Maybe it’s something new that moved them and they think might move you too.  Each week, a new subject, a new voice writing on… something they love.

This week we once again have the pleasure of having Ensley F. Guffey share his love of War Comics, but this time on a more specific period and set of characters – Johnny Red and the Falcon Squadron. 

As I think the last Ensley F. Guffey On… War Comics showed, my love of the genre began early, and Sgt. Rock and the rest of DC’s war line are some of the very first comics I read and obsessed over. To this day I maintain that DC was the preeminent publisher of war comics in the US, and that very few comics have matched, much less surpassed DC’s work, particularly in the period 1960 – 1975.

Read the rest of this entry

Ensley F. Guffey On… War Comics

Each week, one of Biff Bam Pop’s illustrious writers will delve into one of their favorite things.  Perhaps it’s a movie or album they’ve carried with them for years.  Maybe it’s something new that moved them and they think might move you too.  Each week, a new subject, a new voice writing on… something they love.

This week we have the pleasure of having Ensley F. Guffey share his love of War Comics, after the jump. 

DC's war comics characters, drawn by Joe Kubert for the History of the DC Universe Portfolio, 1986.

DC’s war comics characters, drawn by Joe Kubert for the History of the DC Universe Portfolio, 1986.

Read the rest of this entry

BAMF! Your Way To Nightcrawler #1 On The Wednesday Run–April 9, 2014

There are a lot of comic books released by a multitude of comic book publishers every Wednesday, carefully (or, sometimes, haphazardly) displayed on store shelves, each one vying for your attention and the dollars in your wallet.

Today, only one of those comics has the draw of a beloved character, not seen for some time, written by the hand of an industry legend that helped make that character famous through the 1970’s and 1980’s.

BAMF! your way through the jump towards Nightcrawler #1!

Read the rest of this entry

%d bloggers like this: