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“Amazing Spider-Man: Renew Your Vows #1” Brings the Spider-Family to Marvel NOW!

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For many Spider-Man fans, a huge chunk of why we loved the character was stolen from us when the Peter Parker/Mary Jane Watson marriage was undone by the magical means of Mephisto. Now, Marvel Comics brings us a chance to see what might have been, with AMAZING SPIDER-MAN: RENEW YOUR VOWS #1. Details after the jump.

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Biff Bam Pop’s It’s All Connected – Just a Kid from Brooklyn: Captain America, American Memories of World War II, and the MCU, Part II

 

Splash page from The Ultimates #1, 2002. Script by Mark Millar, art by Bryan Hitch.

Splash page from The Ultimates #1, 2002. Script by Mark Millar, art by Bryan Hitch.

In the first part of this essay, I briefly sketched the construction of American memories of World War II that began slightly before the war and continue into the 21st century. In many ways the war has become a defining part of American identity, and the dominant, triumphal memory narrative we have created about it serves to elevate American participation in the war almost to the level of the sacred, and certainly to the realm of the simple black and white, good v. evil duality that is much more comforting than any messy and contradictory reality might be. The character of Steve Rogers/Captain America is one of the more perfect cultural artifacts to illustrate this process of memory construction, and the ways in which counter-memories, which challenge the dominant narrative, inevitably influence the national mythology.

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The Amazing Spider-Man Pregame: Who Were Peter Parker’s Parents?

Who were Peter Parker’s parents? This is not a concept that many of us ever think of. As readers, as fans, we are far too invested in Aunt May, worrying over her health, and how she herself worries over Peter. And then there’s Uncle Ben, whose death is the not only the catharsis for the true origin of Spider-Man, but also the core of the famous phrase, “With great power comes great responsibility.” It is shameful but it’s true, Peter’s aunt and uncle are so important in the Spider-Man mythology, that no one hardly, if ever, gives any thought to his parents.

Who were Richard and Mary Parker? Let’s find out after the jump.
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Tales from the Longbox – The Amazing Spider-Man Annual #16 (1982)

Every other week, Jason Shayer will highlight an issue or a run of issues pulled from the horde of comic book long boxes that occupy more room in his house than his wife can tolerate. Each of these reviews will delve into what made that issue or run significant as well as discuss the creative personalities behind the work. “Long Box” refers to the lengthy, white cardboard boxes most comics find themselves stored within – bagged, alphabetized and numerically ordered.

Amazing Spider-Man Annual #16
1982
“Who’s That Lady?”
Writer: Roger Stern
Penciler: John Romita Jr.
Inking: John Romita Sr.

This annual turned out to be more of a team-up story with co-star Captain Marvel stealing most of the spotlight. Captain Marvel’s 17-page origin was a textbook example of how to concisely craft and introduce a new superhero. Stern leveraged her point-of-view as a rookie superhero with access to almost unlimited powers, but was still trying to understand and control them.

In an interview for Back Issue magazine #54, Roger Stern admited: “With Captain Marvel, I did my best to create a character in the Lee/Kirby/Ditko tradition, a down-to-Earth person who suddenly acquired extraordinary power. And I wanted her to be a straightforward, likable superhero.”

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Tales from the Longbox – The Amazing Spider-Man #238 (1983)

Every other week, Jason Shayer will highlight an issue or a run of issues pulled from the horde of comic book long boxes that occupy more room in his house than his wife can tolerate. Each of these reviews will delve into what made that issue or run significant as well as discuss the creative personalities behind the work. “Long Box” refers to the lengthy, white cardboard boxes most comics find themselves stored within – bagged, alphabetized and numerically ordered.

Amazing Spider-Man #238 (March 1983)
Writer: Roger Stern
Artists: John Romita Jr./John Romita Sr.

In retrospect, Amazing Spider-Man #238 was the most important issue of Spider-Man of the 1980s. At the time though, no one was expecting the birth of a new supervillain who would plague Spider-Man for years to come.

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