The Week In Horror: New ‘Owl Man’ Prank, Toho’s Dracula, Ash vs. Evil Dead + Fessenden’s ‘Depraved’

This week Hex Studios released their latest Owl Man prank video. The Owl Man debuted in Lord of Tears, directed by Lawrie Brewster and written by Sarah Daly. It’s the story of a school teacher plagued by recurring nightmares who returns to his home in Scotland to try to uncover their source. There he encounters the terrifying Owl Man, a well-dressed gent with a terrifying owl head and talons for hands. It’s an effective piece of cinematic folk horror. The Owl Man has returned in Hex’s newest film, The Black Gloves. All of the videos have been hilarious; check out the latest one.

Arrow Video announced a UK/US release of a trio of Toho Studio Dracula films in May. These obscure Japanese horror titles, The Vampire Doll, Lake of Dracula, and Evil of Dracula were inspired by the Gothic horror films coming from Hammer Films in the 1960s and ’70s. The three  will be sold together with brand new transfers and will be available on May 14 (UK) and May 15 (US).

Episode 1 of the third season of the Starz Ash vs. Evil Dead series is up today, picking up a few months after the events of season two. We find Ash enjoying some much-deserved success for a change as the hero of Elk’s Grove, but naturally, some asshole on Antiques Roadshow reads from the Necronomicon Ex-Mortis. The show continues to be as hilarious as it is gory!

Oh, and Larry Fessenden is making a Frankenstein flick called Depraved.  I asked the same question: do we need another one already? But that’s a stupid question, because Frankenstein is a timeless story that still speaks to us today. So yes, you should be excited. Plus, Fessenden has come up with a unique take on the characters that I’m really excited about. Interestingly, the writer/director/producer/actor has had a hand in many modern takes of the classic monsters: he wrote and directed a vampire flick called Habit and produced both a werewolf film (Late Phases) and a gill man film (Hypothermia). I welcome his take on Frankenstein as the newest chapter in his art-house horror rebuild of the Universal monsters.


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