Advertisements

Blog Archives

The Ten Percent – The Best One-Night Stands!

aten1

“Ninety percent of everything is crud.” – Theodore Sturgeon

Greetings and welcome to another installment of The Ten Percent, a space where Ensley F. Guffey and I take a look at the inverse of Sturgeon’s Law; in other words, the small portion of everything which is not crud. Viewed as a whole, Sturgeon was, sadly, right – the vast majority of movies, television, writing, art, and so on really is crud – but there has always been that slim slice of sublime. The Ten Percent isn’t limited by genre – I think our previous columns have proven that point – and that’s because these rare gems are high quality productions which demand more of their viewer than simple passive reception.

Read the rest of this entry

Advertisements

Guardians of the Galaxy S01 E02: Knowhere to Run

gua1

When we last left our heroes, the Guardians of the Galaxy had come into possession of a puzzle box, called the Cosmic Seed, with clues to Star-Lord’s true heritage. While investigating its meaning on Knowhere, the dead Celestial’s head began to return to life, shaking things up quite a bit. Meet me after the quantum jump for my thoughts on “Knowhere to Run.”

Read the rest of this entry

One Hundred Years of Ingrid Bergman

TIFF celebrates the work of Ingrid Bergman, luminous Hollywood angel (pictured here in Casablanca with Humphrey Bogart)

Well not exactly. But August 29th will mark the one hundredth birthday of Ingrid Bergman, if she were alive. To mark the occasion, TIFF is mounting Notorious: Celebrating the Ingrid Bergman Centenary, a program featuring many of the revered actress’s best films. From Hollywood classics like  Casablanca (1942) and Notorious (1946) to the Italian neorealism of Stromboli (1950) to the amusing later vintage of Murder on the Orient Express (1974), the great Swedish actress was beautiful, talented and always keenly intelligent.

Read the rest of this entry

The Ten Percent: Cloud Atlas (2012)

Cloud Atlas (2012) promotional poster.

Cloud Atlas (2012) promotional poster.

“Ninety percent of everything is crud.” – Theodore Sturgeon

Hello and welcome back to “The Ten Percent,” a regular column here on Biff Bam Pop! where every other week K. Dale Koontz and I take a look at the inverse of Sturgeon’s Law; in other words, the ten percent of everything which is not crud. Sometimes it can be hard to remember that for each film or television show that gets people talking years after its premiere, there are hundreds of others that barely cleared the horizon before being (thankfully) shot down. The works that soar above the rest – well, those are the works that stand the test of time. It’s no surprise then that most of the works we’ve discussed here were produced at least ten years ago (Breaking Bad being a notable exception, because Breaking Bad). The passage of time sorts things out, and separates the merely momentarily popular from works that continue to speak to audiences across the years.

Read the rest of this entry

The Ten Percent: Play It, Sam!

“Ninety percent of everything is crud.” – Theodore Sturgeon

CasablancaHello and welcome to another installment of “The Ten Percent,” a regular column here on BiffBamPop! where every other week Ensley F. Guffey and I take a look at the inverse of Sturgeon’s Law; in other words, the small portion of everything which is not crud. Sometimes it can be hard to remember that for each film or television show that gets people talking years or even decades after its premiere, there are hundreds of others that barely cleared the horizon before being (thankfully) shot down. The works that soar above the horizon – well, those are the works that stand the test of time. And don’t be fooled into thinking that genre matters to The Ten Percent – slapstick comedy is in here, along with science fiction, animation, bloody horror, toe-tapping musicals, and more. The Ten Percent last for two reasons: (1) they are high quality productions which demand more of their viewer than simple passive reception and (2) they somehow manage to capture something fleeting and rare and preserve it for the lucky viewing public.

Something like Casablanca.

Really, if you haven’t seen this high-water mark of filmmaking, I almost envy you, because you get to see it for the first time. So what makes this 1942 black-and-white romance picture part of The Ten Percent?

Read the rest of this entry

31 Days of Horror – The Man Who Laughs

The Man Who Laughs from 1928 should be remembered alongside other silent classics like The Phantom of the Opera and The Hunchback of Notre Dame but somehow it slipped between the cracks over the years. Making this oversight more upsetting is the fact that this film was pretty much the blueprint for what would become the Universal horrors of the 1930s. More after the jump.
Read the rest of this entry

%d bloggers like this: