Sleepy Hollow S02 E07: Deliverance

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On last week’s episode of “Sleepy Hollow,” Ichabod did some yoga and saved Joe Corbin from the mythical Wendigo. But, Henry is up to no good and has poisoned Katrina. Can Ichabod save his wife? Should he take a vote?

Duties

While Ichabod Crane and Abbie discuss the small turn out at the voting booth and how it took close to 200 years and a few adjustments to the Constitution for her to get the freedom to vote, Katrina is experiencing the side effect of Henry’s trickery. Katrina is sick and our headless horseman has to protect Katrina once again when Henry and his goons enter to take Katrina with them. Abraham (Neil Jackson) does everything in his power to protect Katrina, but Henry’s magic is stronger. Abraham has transformed from a frightening folktale to a man of honor. I don’t know about you, but… I like this new and improved Headless Horseman and he’s a cutie.

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Thanks to Abraham’s efforts, Katrina, in full colonial fashion, escapes from the goons and is brought to the hospital. The doctor is unable to help; her medical degree didn’t cover witchcraft. Katrina leaves the hospital in a corset and jeans and what I call a modified steampunk look. Abbie and Ichabod take a vote on how to trick Henry into giving them the cure for what ails Katrina but in the end, it’s Abbie who finds the clue for what’s happening to Katrina. While Ichabod meets with Henry, Abbie drops in on the merry men of Hellfire. She finds a few failed experiments and sees them trying to decipher a clay tablet.

Henry

This whole season, Ichabod and Katrina argued about Henry/Jeremy aka second horsemen of the apocalypse. Katrina thinks that Henry still has enough goodness in him, but Ichabod and Abbie disagree. In most families, it’s always the mom who defends the wayward child. It’s the mother’s job to protect the cub, but a cub needs to learn right from wrong and that job, more often than not, is given to the father. I don’t think Henry can be saved. He has tried to kill his parents on several occasions like the honorary bad seed that he is.

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It’s kind of hard to feel any sympathy for Henry. John Noble does a fine job of portraying his character as an evil, conniving snake in the grass, but there is nothing about the character that makes us feel any pity. What connection can Katrina and Ichabod feel for a man that was never a child to them. They weren’t there to watch Henry grow from infant to man. What bond could there be between the three. Henry is a stranger and he’s strange. Because there is no bonding between the parents and Henry, I find myself unconcerned for Henry’s soul or salvation.

So, the monster of this week’s episode was the demon that Katrina carried inside her via black magic spider. We’re not talking just any demon, but a bouncing baby Moloch. Yep, this week’s monster was known as the ‘Horrid King’ and there was only one way to kill it. We can thank Ben Franklin and his interest in the aurora borealis for the spiritual miscarriage.

Conclusion

Ichabod finally gets to question Katrina’s intentions with Abraham. She swears she’s only spying on him. Abbie has to step back while Ichabod and Katrina talk about love, children and the good ole days.

Ichabod’s chat with Henry does nothing to ease his or our minds that Henry will do the right thing. Henry never does the right thing and he can’t keep blaming his lousy childhood for all his angst. No one has the perfect childhood, Henry. Get over it.

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Abbie, who was in the outs with her Captain, is back in the fold thanks to her telling Reyes the whereabouts of the Hellfire Club and, Ichabod is allowed back to help the police as a Colonial criminal profiler… don’t ask, I’m still trying to figure that one out.

I had mentioned before how much I enjoy when Ichabod does his name dropping. I always do my own investigation to make sure that the show has it right. Ichabod was right about Benjamin Franklin’s interest in the aurora borealis. Franklin had observed the Northern lights on a trip across the Atlantic. He deduced that they were caused by a concentration of electrical charges that was intensified by snow and moisture. The release of power into the air caused the illumination. Franklin’s aurora prism saved the day.

Don’t worry about Henry, my little sleepy heads. With his plans for Katrina squashed, Henry is busy whipping up another monster for episode eight. And, don’t forget to vote.

 

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