Category Archives: music

31 Days of Horror: Dio Live In London Hammersmith Apollo 1993

If you want to talk about scares during the month of October, when it comes to music, it’s hard not to think of the legendary Ronnie James Dio. From his days in Elf and Rainbow, through to his seminal albums with Black Sabbath and then in his own self-titled band, Dio always portrayed himself as a badass, the Wizard of Rock and Roll, holding the Devil Horns in the air while wailing that unmistakeable banshee wail. Dio may have been diminutive in stature, but when it came to heavy metal, the man ruled over all.

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The GAR! Podcast: Prince and Jack Chick

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Biff Bam Pop! presents The GAR! Podcast, the Glenn Walker and Ray Cornwall weekly podcast where they talk unrehearsed about whatever happens to come to mind. It’s an audio-zine for your mind, a nerd exploration of a nerd world. This week, we’re talking His Royal Badness as Prince releases two new albums this week, also Jack Chick, Jack Daniels barbecue sauce, Original Sin, and the Collingswood Book Festival. See and hear more after the jump.

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The GAR! Podcast: The Interviews

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Usually every Friday at this time Biff Bam Pop! presents the newest episode of The GAR! Podcast, the Glenn Walker and Ray Cornwall weekly podcast where they talk unrehearsed about whatever happens to come to mind, an audio-zine for your mind, a nerd exploration of a nerd world. This week however, GAR! is on a short hiatus. In its place we’re featuring some of the interviews that you might have missed before GAR! came to Biff Bam Pop!. Stay tuned for some of the previous guests of The GAR! Podcast, after the jump.

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A Rock ‘N’ Roll Crucible: U2–Songs Of Innocence (2014) Reviewed

U2 Songs of Innocence album coverNot counting last year’s “Ordinary Love” from the Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom film and this year’s “Invisible” for Product Red, it’s been five years since we last heard from U2.

No Line On the Horizon, the band’s twelfth studio album, released in early 2009, was a relative failure in terms of sales, even if the resulting world tour was the highest grossing concert tour in history. It was evident: people still wanted to hear and see U2. For that reason and that reason alone, the aged Irish rockers can still be deemed as being relevant musically, politically, and culturally. With the surprise album release of Songs of Innocence last week, five long years since their last proper album, U2, the long-lasting survivors of rock and roll, test the theory of relevancy once more.

And they come through that crucible in one of the most unexpected ways imaginable: if not through the music itself, then through the musical process.

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The GAR! Podcast: Robin Williams, Led Zeppelin, and Howard the Duck

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Biff Bam Pop! presents The GAR! Podcast, the Glenn Walker and Ray Cornwall weekly podcast where they talk unrehearsed about whatever happens to come to mind. It’s an audio-zine for your mind, a nerd exploration of a nerd world. This week, it’s all about the sad loss earlier this week of Robin Williams, some music we like and don’t like, and the troubled history of Steve Gerber and Howard the Duck. See and hear more after the jump.

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Yes Move Heaven and Earth And Create A Beautiful Album

A new album from a classic group can often be problematic – nobody sells albums anymore, especially bands of an older ilk who are faced with an aging fan base that solely wants to hear the hits of yesteryear delivered live. Try as I might to convince someone that the Rolling Stones A Bigger Bang was a solid addition to their catalogue, or that The Who’s Endless Wire was a consistently strong piece of art, there’s a good shot it will fall on deaf ears. The same can be said for prog rock masters Yes, who, in 2011, put out Fly From Here, an album I consider to be their best since 1980’s Drama. Some of their unrelentingly vocal fan base may agree with, while others would take the absence of founding member and lead singer Jon Anderson as reason enough to dismiss that effort.

If that’s the case, there’s no way I’ll be able to convince you that the band’s latest album, Heaven and Earth, is even better than Fly From Here. Or that, in my humble opinion, Yes has delivered a modern masterpiece.


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Win A Copy Of Soundgarden’s Superunknown!

soundgarden-superunknownWe want you alive in the superunknown!

One of the greatest albums of the grunge era, Superunknown was a tour de force for Soundgarden, arguably the hardest hitting band of the era. Where would we be without Fell On Black Days, Spoonman, My Wave and Black Hole Sun? Those songs have seeped into the consciousness of music lovers and helped make Soundgarden legends. The band recently released a 2 disc 20th Anniversary edition of the album; the first disc is the remastered album, the second features demos, alternate versions, b-sides and unreleased tracks. We’ve got a few copies for you to win, thanks to our pals at Universal Music Canada.

All you have to do is leave a message in the comments section telling us what your favourite song from Superunknown is. Easy and simple! We’ll choose two random winners and notify them via email. The contest closes Tuesday June 11 at 11:59 pm. So stop reading, and enter now!

Jammin’ in Cali – Deep Purple Live In California 74 Reviewed

Whenever I write about Deep Purple, I always mention that, no matter what classic rock radio would try and have you believe, the band has a rich history that goes way beyond Smoke On The Water. Sure, Machine Head is probably their definitive moment, the album that should have already put them in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. However, there is more to Deep Purple than just one album, or even one line-up.

Live In CaliforniaThe folks at Eagle Rock recently released the 8 track Deep Purple Live in California 1974, capturing the line-up of David Coverdale (vocals), Glenn Hughes (bass/vocals), Ritchie Blackmore (guitar), Jon Lord (keyboards) and Ian Paice (drums) at the massive California Jam Festival, where the band played in front of 200,000 fans and more watching on television. This version of Deep Purple had recently released the album Burn, the first with Coverdale and Hughes, and it’s a great rock record, a bit of a hidden classic that deserves a wider audience to this day.

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