Category Archives: movies

31 Days of Horror 2014: See No Evil 2 (2014)

soskas-webBack in the 1980’s, Stephen King famously said that he had seen the new face of horror and that it belonged to Clvie Barker. Now, while I know I’m not anywhere the Master’s league, whenever I think about the work of Jen and Sylvia Soska, I feel as though they’re the new “new” face of horror. If that’s the case, the genre is in good hands.

Like many, I first discovered the Soska Sisters with their groundbreaking, body modification horror film, American Mary. A low budget movie that doesn’t look it, American Mary features a stellar performance by the luminous Katharine Isabelle as a med student who enters the lucrative world of body modification surgery. The film is often gruesome, but it doesn’t rely on the gore; this is a character driven horror flick at its finest (it’s on Netflix and TMN in Canada and is absolutely worth your time; even my mom thought it was “interesting”, which, believe me, is high praise).

This week, the Soska Sisters return with their latest directorial effort, See No Evil 2, a sequel to a film I never saw in the first place. The original stars WWE superstar Glenn “Kane” Jacobs as serial killer Jacob Goodnight, who was apparently killed at the end of the first film, but you know how these things go. Instead, Goodnight returns to terrorize a bunch of students at a morgue where birthday girl Amy (Danielle Harris) has to work late.

Read the rest of this entry

About these ads

Free Spirit: The Tale of the Princess Kaguya

Any film from Studio Ghibli is a treat. The Japanese anime house has put out some great movies over the years, including Hayao Miyazake’s films Princess Mononoke (1997), Spirited Away (2001), and Howl’s Moving Castle (2004). Now officially retired, Miyazake’s worked slowly but steadily, putting out a film every five years or so. His Studio Ghibli cofounder Isao Takahata is even less prolific. The director of the masterful WWII story Grave of the Fireflies (1988) has only made three films since, his last My Neighbors the Yamadas (1999) released over fourteen years ago. His return at age 78 with The Tale of the Princess Kaguya (2014) shows that Takahata hasn’t missed a beat. Beautiful and moving, he delivers another anime masterpiece.

Read the rest of this entry

31 Days of Horror 2014 – Phantasm (1979)

Oh Phantasm, Don Coscarelli’s cult classic masterpiece. What is it about this movie and this franchise? Why can’t I quit you?

These are not good movies. Come on, you know it too. Phantasm makes no sense, the plot strays, no loose ends are tied, the dialogue, special effects, and sound effects are way out of the normal acceptable cheese range. But it works. I think that’s what it is, the magic of Phantasm. It doesn’t need you to understand. It doesn’t care if you get it or not. The first instalment is 88 minutes of unapologetic spooky, sexy entertainment and that’s that. Phantasm keeps it simple while still managing to be anything but ordinary. It lets you simply sit back, turn your brain off, and immerse yourself in the nightmare of the Tall Man, killer dwarves from another dimension, and as the main character learns is the scariest thing of all: fear itself.

Read the rest of this entry

Fury Over Gone Girl: Biff Bam Pop’s Weekend Box Office Wrap-Up Report

box1

Our Box Office Predictions from a few days back had Gone Girl remaining at the top of the heap over Brad Pitt’s new war flick, Fury. Did Brad flip the script on Ben? And what kind of competition did the Books, Bad Days, and Beginning Vampires put up against the big two? Find out after the jump!

Read the rest of this entry

31 Days of Horror 2014 – Clive Barker’s Nightbreed: The Director’s Cut (2014)

In March of 1990, I had just recently turned 13 years old. I was on a family trip to Houston to visit some friends of my father, but for me, the most important thing to accomplish this trip, aside from studying for my imminent Bar Mitzvah, was finding a movie theatre that was showing Clive Barker’s Nightbreed. The film had been rated R in Canada, which meant nobody under 18 was allowed to see it (screw you, Big Brother!). On one of our final nights, Dad (ill at the time), his friend and me schlepped to some out of the way movie theatre, where the film was still playing. Walt, my Dad’s friend, hates horror movies, so he opted to see Look Who’s Talking, while we went and sat through Clive’s monster movie equivalent of Star Wars. Having read both the original novel, Cabal, and the Epic Comics adaptation, I was psyched to see the creatures of Midian come to life. And when they did, I thoroughly enjoyed. Admittedly, I was also thrilled to be seeing a film some watchdogs seemed to think I wasn’t ready for (up yours, Big Brother!). However, my enjoyment was slightly curtailed as the film’s conclusion, when I asked Dad if he liked it.

“No,” he scoffed. “It wasn’t even scary.”

Not scary! Not scary! What do you mean, not scary. It was…it was….

Look, Dad had a point, ok. Even if I loved it.

Read the rest of this entry

Fury vs The Book Of Life – Biff Bam Pop’s Box Office Predictions

Two new releases want you to pick them this weekend, but as we know, only one can hit the top of the box office. Which will it be? Here are our predictions:

Fury_2014_posterBrad Pitt has been making the rounds promoting his World War II film Fury, about a group of group behind enemy lines, manning a tank called, you guessed it, Fury. Now, here’s the thing about Brad Pitt – he’s a Hollywood star, but I don’t view him as a bankable movie star, so how a film he’s top-lining performs is always a crap shoot to me. I’m of the belief that this one is going to under perform – the trailers haven’t been outstanding, and I feel that awareness isn’t huge. Look for a second place showing with $20 million.

Read the rest of this entry

31 Days of Horror 2014 – L’Inferno (1911)

LInferno 1911Think of the high pitched screech of metal across metal, the low guttural growl of a wild animal or the rapid plucking of violin strings again and again to illicit a sense of tension. Undoubtedly, one of the most important elements of any horror film is sound: both in music score and in effects.

Still, visceral imagery and the underlying text that a film is based upon can have an enormous affect on the mindset of a viewer.

At the beginning of the twentieth century, at the origin of the art form we call film, the black and white L’Inferno, released in 1911, silent and arresting, tested the relevance of this treatise. The result was an overwhelmingly popular and horrifying experience for all of those that viewed the film then, as well as those that view it today.

Read the rest of this entry

31 Days of Horror 2014 – Zodiac (2007)

Some horror doesn’t need to be gory. It doesn’t need to be violent, nor does it have to be supernatural.

Sometimes the biggest scares of all are the ones that come from real life.

Such was the case with the Zodiac killer, who terrorized the Bay Area back in the late 60’s and early 70’s, never to be captured.

The story of the Zodiac became an American legend, and in 2007, it also became one of director David Fincher’s greatest films.

Read the rest of this entry

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 425 other followers

%d bloggers like this: