Category Archives: movie review

Wim Wenders at TIFF: Paris, Texas

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Wim Wenders’ visionary Palme d’Or winning film Paris, Texas is the culmination of the director’s many years of hard work capturing life on the road. This poetic study of what it means for one to belong in the world transcends language and reality.

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Wim Wenders at TIFF: The American Friend

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Wim Wenders’ neo-noir thriller, The American Friend, looks like it was cut from the same cloth as other films from the genre. When viewing the film in 2016, it’s hard not to make stylistic connections to such titles as: The French Connection, Chinatown, and Point Blank. However, what makes The American Friend stand out from its counterparts is that it doesn’t concern itself with trying to fulfill a mysterious plotline.

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Winter at TIFF: Wim Wenders’ Early Shorts

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As part of their expansive retrospective on the exceptional German director Wim Wenders, The TIFF Bell Lightbox delivers a rare opportunity to see the man’s early short films as one screening. Most of these films date back to the late 1960s when Wenders was a film student in Munich. The films are the collected diaries of a young filmmaker experimenting with the medium, searching for his voice. While many of the films feel like fragmented snapshots of little consequence, it is evident that a vision is starting to form. Viewing the compilation in the context of Wenders’ later work, it is miraculous to see the jump in craftsmanship in such a short amount of time.

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Less Lee Moore Reviews New Horror Film Jeruzalem

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Jeruzalem, the first feature from brothers Doran and Yoav Paz, has a tantalizing premise. For one thing, it’s not a found footage movie, at least according to the pair of Israeli filmmakers. They have called Jeruzalem a “POV” film, which is quite accurate and could probably be applied to a few more recent horror films like Open Windows, iLived, and Unfriended. It’s an interesting idea, but does it work? Yes and no, but more on that later.

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Lost Generations: The Films of Wim Wenders

German director Wim Wenders captures the miasma of a lost generation in Kings of the Road

Quick. Name Kurt Cobain’s favourite movie. Fight Club? BZZT! He was long gone by the time Fincher’s slacker opus came out. QuadropheniaThe Elephant Man? No doubt they’d have been right up his alley. But actually, Cobain’s on record that his favourite film is a little art-house flick called Paris, Texas, from the German director Wim Wenders. An intriguing film about an amnesiac Harry Dean Stanton slowly reconnecting with his family, Biff Bam Pop’s Daniel Reed will be looking at that one in an upcoming piece, and Andy Burns will be writing about Wenders’s sci-fi opus Until the End of the World. We’re taking a good look at the acclaimed German director, as TIFF mounts its retrospective On the Road: The Films of Wenders.

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Beautifully Drawn Boy: The Thrilling, Wrenching Journey of Boy and the World

When you’re young, very young, the world is bright and bold, a riot of colour and creatures and moments tumbling one to the next. Boy and the World, a newly released animated feature from Brazilian director Alê Abreu, captures that vibrant fleeting spirit magnificently. From its opening moments, the film is a superb experiment in marrying image and soundtrack, a lovely kaleidoscopic zooming outward as a jaunty flute melody builds. We’re plunged into the world of Boy, our nameless protagonist playing in the pastoral rainbow-scape of rural Brazil. His journey from there to the big city brims with revelatory moments, dragging in its wake a stinging indictment of global capitalism.

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Marie Gilbert’s Review of The Revenant

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This past week, I was able to drag my hubby to see two great films and, let me tell you that was no small feat. We saw The Hateful Eight and you can read my review here, and recently, we saw The Revenant. Although both stories take place in our country’s past, it was The Revenant that I was drawn to the most. What made The Revenant so remarkable? Find out after the jump. Read the rest of this entry

Toronto Jewish Film Festival: Wedding Doll

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Nitzan Gilady’s latest film, Wedding Doll, is a dark portrait of a small Israeli community that exists on the edge of the Negev Desert. The town overlooks the prehistoric Makhtesh Ramon – a massive orange crater where many of the film’s characters congregate in order to reflect and socialize.

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Marie Gilbert Reviews Tarantino’s The Hateful Eight

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I love a good western and I love movies directed by Quentin Tarantino, so when I had the chance to see The Hateful Eight, my hubby and I scooted over to the Deptford AMC Theatre. Sitting in one of Deptford’s comfy leather recliners with our hot chocolate and popcorn, we were ready for the three hour film and the anticipated action done 70 mm format style. Did Tarantino deliver? Grab a warm horse blanket and follow me. Read the rest of this entry

The 17th Annual Animation Show of Shows

We Can’t Live Without Cosmos is one of the standouts of the Animation Show of Shows

Wannabe astronauts simulating free-fall bouncing on the beds in their dorm like trampolines. A free-thinker on an assembly line who dares to scrawl squiggles in a world of striped boxes. A clone from the future visits her originator’s child self, because time loops but really loneliness. Animation opens so many windows on the world, expressive, vivid and unique. It’s a demanding, labour-intensive, expensive medium, keeping animated features down to four or five a year. There’s a burgeoning world of animated shorts out there, though, artists who take a sliver of time and conjure up something wonderful. For seventeen years, veteran animation producer and founder of ACME Filmworks Ron Diamond has put together a program called the Animation Show of Shows. Each year he scours the globe for animation talent to work in his studio. In his travels, he’s constantly discovering vibrant new work, which he curates for his annual series. The past sixteen years Diamond has taken his Show of Shows to major animation houses like Pixar, Dreamworks and Disney, and also to animation schools, showing established and up-and-coming animators rare and hard-to-find films to challenge and inspire them. This year is different though. While Diamond’s pulled together another stellar slate of shorts, this time around the Animation Show of Shows has gone public, and is touring theatres in the U.S., Canada and even further abroad. With three films short-listed for the Oscars in the program, it’s a bite-sized treat.

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