Category Archives: Jason Shayer

Tales from the Longbox – Star Wars #38 (1980)

In Tales from the Longbox, Jason Shayer highlights an issue or a run of issues pulled from the horde of comic book long boxes that occupy more room in his house than his wife can tolerate. Each of these reviews will delve into what made that issue or run significant as well as discuss the creative personalities behind the work. “Long Box” refers to the lengthy, white cardboard boxes most comics find themselves stored within – bagged, alphabetized and numerically ordered.

 

1980 - Michael Golden Star Wars 38BStar Wars #38 – “Riders in the Void!”
Marvel Comics, 1980
Writers – Archie Goodwin/Michael Golden
Artists – Michael Golden/Terry Austin

A few months ago, Disney announced that Marvel Comics would take over the Star Wars licensing rights in 2015. I thought I’d look back at Marvel Comics’ first go at the series in the late 1970s. Star Wars #38 is seen by fans as one of the best stand-alone comic stories of that series. This fill-in issue was published just before Star Wars #39-44 adapted Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back.

Editor Archie Goodwin does double-duty as writer in this issue with a plot assist from artist Michael Golden. In an interview with TheForce.Net, Golden recalled:

“I told Archie this story that I wanted to do and he loved it, so I sat down and drew it and Terry Austin inked it. After I had sat down to the drawing it, Archie actually called me and said they were actually going to use the story right away, so I finished up the pencils and it went off to Terry Austin to ink. I was originally supposed to write it as well, but because they needed it right away, Archie sat down and wrote it based on my notes.”

“Riders in the Void” kicks off with one hell of a splash page:
1980 - Michael Golden Star Wars 38p1

A desperate hyperspace jump strands Luke and Leia somewhere far beyond their galaxy. In the darkness of the void, they encounter a strange organic ship that rescues them, but then suddenly attacks them, trying to assess who and what they are. While they prove up to the challenges, the consciousness within the ship seems mad, and as they make their way deeper into the ship, they find the pilot. He turns out to be the last survivor of two long dead races that mutually destroyed themselves and has merged his consciousness with the ship’s controls.

It returns them to their galaxy where it engages an Imperial Star Destroyer, believing it to be part of a constructed reality the computer is creating for its amusement. When the Star Destroyer fights back and hurts it, the organic ship makes quick work of it and realizes that it isn’t much fun anymore. Dropping off Luke and Leia, the mad ship retreats into the void where it belongs and resumes playing its computer-generated games.

As a stand alone issue, it does what it’s meant to do. For a comic book series that’s constantly struggling with making any kind of changes to their cast, this issue turns the point of view around and giving this living ship some character moments. Unfortunately, it doesn’t change despite the climax of the story, the ship realizes it wants nothing to do with this reality and fades back into the void and the comfort of its artificial reality.

1980 - Michael Golden Star Wars 38p2A

1980 - Michael Golden Star Wars 38p2B

 

However, Michael Golden’s art is simply lovely and stands out as a high watermark in the world of licensed comic books. The detailed inks by Terry Austin add another layer of beauty, providing very clean, very crisp lines. Golden’s art never looked so good.

 

Jason Shayer has been trying his best not to grow up for that last 30 years and comics books are one of the best ways to keep him young at heart. He’s also known as the Marvel 1980s guy and has probably forgotten more than you’d ever want to know about that wonderfully creative era. Check out his blog at: marvel1980s.blogspot.com.

About these ads

Tales From The Longbox – Jason Shayer’s Favourite 10 Thor Covers from the 1980s

I could have easily picked 10 Thor covers by Walt Simonson alone, but I wanted to insert a bit of diversity and spotlight a few of the wonderful artists that created some amazing covers during the 1980s.


001 - thor337

The Mighty Thor #337 – The cover that changed everything. As a 12 year-old kid, this cover blew my mind. I remember picking it up from a spinner rack. Never had I seen a comic book logo destroyed. And who was that on the cover of The Mighty Thor. By Odin, an amazing cover for probably the greatest single issue of the 1980s!

Read the rest of this entry

Tales from the Longbox – Alpha Flight #9-10 (1984)

Every other week, Jason Shayer will highlight an issue or a run of issues pulled from the horde of comic book long boxes that occupy more room in his house than his wife can tolerate. Each of these reviews will delve into what made that issue or run significant as well as discuss the creative personalities behind the work. “Long Box” refers to the lengthy, white cardboard boxes most comics find themselves stored within – bagged, alphabetized and numerically ordered.

Alpha Flight #10Alpha Flight #9-10
April-May 1984
Writer/Penciler/Inker: John Byrne

This story takes place in the later half of Byrne’s first year on Alpha Flight, where he was trying to do something different with the team super hero dynamics. After their initial team outing in issue #1, Byrne split the team up and over the next 10 issues, he would dedicated the series to individual story arcs, all working towards regrouping the team for the big climax in Alpha Flight #11-12.
Read the rest of this entry

Tales from the Longbox – The Mighty Thor #345-348 (1985)

Every other week, Jason Shayer will highlight an issue or a run of issues pulled from the horde of comic book long boxes that occupy more room in his house than his wife can tolerate. Each of these reviews will delve into what made that issue or run significant as well as discuss the creative personalities behind the work. “Long Box” refers to the lengthy, white cardboard boxes most comics find themselves stored within – bagged, alphabetized and numerically ordered.

Thor_345-00The Mighty Thor #345-348
Jul.-Oct. 1985
Writer/Artist – Walt Simonson

With Thor – The Dark World hitting theatres across North America, I thought it would be fun to look back at the origins of the movie’s antagonist, Malekith the Accursed. Malekith was created by Walt Simonson and made his first appearance in The Mighty Thor #344 (Jun. 1985). He is the ruler of the dark elves who inhabit Svartalfheim, one of the Nine Realms of Asgardian mythology, and wielder of Dark Faerie magic.

Malekith’s tale is often overshadowed by the climax of Simonson’s epic storyline, The Surtur Saga. Malekith was the key plot point as he and his dark elves recovered the Casket of Ancient Winters, which was the elemental weapon used to free Surtur from his fiery realm and kicked off his invasion of Earth. Malekith allied himself with Surtur in revenge against Odin, who had banished him because he had created the Casket of Ancient Winters. Surtur then freed Malekith and set him about on his quest to recover the Casket.
Read the rest of this entry

31 Days of Horror 2013: Tales from the Longbox – The Demon #1-4 (1986)

Every other week, Jason Shayer will highlight an issue or a run of issues pulled from the horde of comic book long boxes that occupy more room in his house than his wife can tolerate. Each of these reviews will delve into what made that issue or run significant as well as discuss the creative personalities behind the work. “Long Box” refers to the lengthy, white cardboard boxes most comics find themselves stored within – bagged, alphabetized and numerically ordered.

demon1The Demon #1-4
1986
Writer – Matt Wagner
Artists – Matt Wagner/Art Nichols

A tip of the hat to JP Fallavollita who covered issue #1 back in July 2012 – http://biffbampop.com/2012/07/30/tales-from-the-long-box-the-demon-1-1987/

Back in 1986, Etrigan the Demon had last enjoyed a regular series 15 years earlier by his legendary creator, Jack Kirby. Alan Moore’s Swamp Thing was rekindling the darker corners of the DC universe and a memorable guest appearance by Etrigan in that title was enough to convince DC to give their rhyming demon another chance.

The Powers-That-Be called upon the services of Matt Wagner who was one of the more prominent Indy creators in the 1980s with his creator-owned series, Mage and Grendel. It’s not difficult to see how the themes that Wagner explored with his own anti-hero Grendel and his own dark world were exactly what DC was looking for.

Read the rest of this entry

Tales from the Longbox – Batman – Gotham by Gaslight (1989)

Every other week, Jason Shayer will highlight an issue or a run of issues pulled from the horde of comic book long boxes that occupy more room in his house than his wife can tolerate. Each of these reviews will delve into what made that issue or run significant as well as discuss the creative personalities behind the work. “Long Box” refers to the lengthy, white cardboard boxes most comics find themselves stored within – bagged, alphabetized and numerically ordered.

Batman - Gotham by Gaslight-000Batman – Gotham by Gaslight
February 1989
48 page one-shot
Writer – Brian Augustyn
Artists – Mike Mignola/P. Craig Russell

“Wrong. Dead wrong. I fooled all London. And I could fool them anywhere, even in Gotham City, if that’s where I chose to appear.
Batman?
Yes, I know the name. And perhaps he’ll soon have reason to remember yours truly,
JACK THE RIPPER”

This clever preface, written by horror writer Robert Bloch who penned several Jack the Ripper tales, was the perfect introduction to Batman: Gotham by Gaslight .Gotham by Gaslight was the first Elseworlds’ story, basically DC’s take on What If? In this case, it was: What if Batman faced off against Jack the Ripper? Read the rest of this entry

Fan Expo 2013 Report – Spotlight on the Simonsons

This weekend at Fan Expo, Marvel Comics historian Jason Shayer was able to sit in on a panel featuring comics legends Walt and Louis Simonson. Here’s Jason’s report!

Spotlight on the Simon sons
Fan Expo 2013
Friday, Aug 23 – 12:30pm

CAM00038

Unfortunately, for some unknown reason, this panel was scheduled for only half an hour. The moderator wisely skipped any introduction or spotlight material and immediately opened the floor to questions.

The first question was about Beta Ray Bill (first appearance in Thor #337, Nov. 1983) which was punctuated by a cosplayer donning an impressive homemade Bill costume. Walt explained that he had carte blanche with the title and wanted to create a new hero who was worthy of the inscription on Mjolnir, Thor’s hammer. Read the rest of this entry

Tales from the Longbox – The Wolverine Limited Series (1982)

Every other week, Jason Shayer highlights an issue or a run of issues pulled from the horde of comic book long boxes that occupy more room in his house than his wife can tolerate. Each of these reviews will delve into what made that issue or run significant as well as discuss the creative personalities behind the work. “Long Box” refers to the lengthy, white cardboard boxes most comics find themselves stored within – bagged, alphabetized and numerically ordered.

WolverineLS01-00Wolverine limited series #1-4
Sept.-Dec. 1982
Writer: Chris Claremont
Artists: Frank Miller and Joe Rubinstein

After seeing The Wolverine and being disappointed with its wasted potential, I thought a look back at the source material might cleanse my pallet. The Wolverine was Marvel’s second limited series (put out in tandem with the Hercules: Prince of Power limited series in 1982) and featured the creative talents of the legendary X-Men scribe, Chris Claremont, and a young up-and-comer named Frank Miller.

The first issue kicks off with this classic monologue: “I’m Wolverine. I’m the best there is at what I do. But what I do isn’t very nice.”

WolverineLS01-01

Read the rest of this entry

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 430 other followers

%d bloggers like this: